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http://archive.org/details/catalogueofoffic9798bost 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS and STUDENTS 



OF 



1897. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 



^9 LU, % y* 

BOSTON, MASS. p& ^?raB| ^* 

#?&' * life. 



^oue^ 




1898. 



PUBLISHED FOR' BOSTON COLLEGE 
1898. 



@. (Ttl. ©♦ <B. 



Boston College. 

This institution, controlled and directed by the Fathers 
of the Society of Jesus, was chartered May 25, 1863, by the 
State of Massachusetts, under the corporate title of the 
u Trustees of Boston College," with power and authority 
u to confer such degrees as are usually conferred by colleges 
in this Commonwealth, except medical degrees." 

Under the act of incorporation, schools were opened 
September 5, 1864. 

The same act of incorporation provides ' ' that no student 
of said College shall be refused admission to, or denied any 
of the privileges, honors, or degrees of said College on 
account of the religious opinions he may entertain." Stu- 
dents that are not Catholics will not be required to parti- 
cipate in any distinctively Catholic exercise, nor will any 
undue influence be exerted to induce a change of religious 
belief. But though no evidence of creed will be a bar to 
admission, evidence will be demanded of the candidate to 
prove good moral character. 



The Trustees of Boston College. 

REV. TIMOTHY BROSNAHAN, S. J., President. 
REV. THOMAS A. REID, S. J., Treasurer. 
REV. ALPHONSE CHARLIER, S. J., Secretary. 
REV. MICHAEL F. BYRNE, S. J. 
REV. ALEXANDER DE ASCHEBERG, S. J. 
TIMOTHY J. FEALY, S. J. 



Faculty and Officers. 

REV. TIMOTHY BROSNAHAN, S. J., 

President ; Prefect of Studies ; Lecturer on Christian Doctrine. 
REV. WILLIAM J. QUIGLEY, S. J., 

Prefect of Schools and Discipline. 
REV. FRANCIS J. O'NEILL, S. J., 

Chaplain. 
REV. THOMAS A. REID, S. J., 

Treasurer. 
JOSEPH J. McLOUGHLIN, S. J., 

Assistant Prefect of Discipline and Secretary. 



College Department. 

REV. THOMAS I, GASSON, S. J., 

Logic ; Metaphysics and Ethics. 
REV. JAMES F. DAWSON, S. J., 

Physics ; Descriptive Geometry. 
REV. GEORGE A. FARGIS, S. J., 

Chemistry. 
FRANCIS J. BARNES, A. M., M. D., 

Physiological Psychology. 
REV. CHARLES MACKSEY, S. J., 

Classics and English in Junior Year ; Calculus. 
REV. PATRICK J. CORMICAN, S. J., 

Classics and English in Sophomore Year. 
WILLIAM J. DUANE, S. J., 

Classics and English in Sophomore Year ; Analytical Geometry. 
REV. JOSEPH M. STADELMAN, S. J., 

Classics and English in Freshman Year ; French. 
ROBERT H. JOHNSON, S. J., 

Classics and English in Freshman Year. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



JOSEPH A. MULRY, S. J., 

Geology. 
PATRICK J. HUGHES, S. J., 

Analytical Geometry ; French. 
REV. JOSEPH V. SCHMIDT, S. J., 

Advanced Algebra ; German. 
FRANCIS P. DONNELLY, S. J., 

Advanced Algebra. 
SAMUEL R. KELLEY, A. M., 

Elocution. 
JOSEPH H. WILLIS, A. M., 

Dramatics. 



Preparatory Department. 

REV. CHARLES MACKSEY, S. J., 

Lecturer on Christian Doctrine. 
REV. PATRICK J. CORMICAN, S. J., 

German. 
FRANCIS P. DONNELLY, S. J., 

Classics and English in First Academic ; French. 
REV. JOSEPH V. SCHMIDT, S. J., 

Classics and English in First Academic. 
PATRICK J. HUGHES, S. J., 

Classics and English in Second Academic. 
JOSEPH A. MULRY, S. J., 

Classics and English in Second Academic ; Algebra. 
REV. MICHAEL C. DOLAN, S. J., 

Classics and English in First Rudiments ; Eloattion. 
JOSEPH H. WILLIS, A. M., 

Classics and English in First Rudiments ; Arithmetic and 
Elementary Algebra. 
JOSEPH C. DRUM, A. B., 

Classics and English in Second Rudiments ; Geometry. 
EDWARD P. O'HARA, A. B., 

Classics and English in Special Class (A) ; French ; Algebra. 
REV. CHARLES F. BRIDGES, S. J., 

Classics, and English in Special Class (B) ; French ; Algebra. 
JAMES P. WARREN, A. B., 

Special English ; French ; Geometry. 
WILLIAM J. DUANE, S. J., 

French. 
REV. JOSEPH M. STADELMAN, S. J., 

Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra. 
JOSEPH J. McLOUGHLIN, S. J., 

Arithmetic. 






Catalogue of Students. 



-|vA.hern, Timothy J. 
^Allchin, Frederic J. 
■ Andrews, Frederick L. 

| Barden, Joseph A. 

Barnes, James T. 

Barrett, John V. 

Bennett, Charles A. 

Bergin, Thomas F. 
fBlackwell, Hugh L. 

Bouffard, Alfred L. 
' Bowles, Benjamin F. 
'Bowman, David L. 
-HBrady, Francis C. 

Braun, Frederick J. 
VBreen, James H. 

Brennan, Dennis M. 

Brennan, Frederick S. 



Philosophy 
Sophomore 
Freshman 



Gen'l Chem. 



Third French 
Third French 
Third French 



V. 



r isreen, james ra 
Brennan, Dennis M 
Brennan, Frederic 
Brennan, James J. 
Brewin, John A. 
Brosnahan, Jeremiah 

7 Brown, George B. 
Brown, Lewis H. 
"^Browne, Francis A. 
^Brownrigg, William A. 
sCBuckley, John C. 
i Burke, John M. 
Burke, Richard S. 
Burke, Thomas J. 
^Burns, James T. 
Burns, Malachi J. 
Butters, Francis L. 

Cady, Joseph P. Rhetoric 

7^Cahill, James I. Freshman 

Callahan, Dennis E. Freshman 

/-Callahan, Henry A. Second Gram. 

> Callahan, William J. Third Gram. 

^Cannon, John J. Special Latin 

•'Carney, Albert S. Freshman 

^Carney, Francis J. Philosophy 

Carney, Francis L- Special Latin 

Carroll, Daniel J. Second Gram. 

Carroll, Felix F. J. Second Gram. 

Cassidy, Bernard J. Special Bng. 

yCassidy, William J. Second Rud. 

Chapman, Daniel J. Philosophy 

XChisholm, Joseph L. Second Rud. 

Ceconi, John A. Special Latin 

Clancy, Patrick H. Special Latin 

Clancy, William H. Special Latin 

Colahan, James A. Third Gram. 

Coleman, David C. Sophomore 
* Now known as Second Academic. 
1 Now known as First Academic. 



First Rud. 

Sophomore Gen'l Chem. 

First Rud. 

Third Gram.* Third French 

Philosophy 

Third Gram. Third French 

First Rud. 

Special Bug. 

Third Gram. 

Special Kng. 

First Rud. 

Second Gram. tSecond French 

Freshman First Freuch 

Second Rud. 

First Rud. 

Philosophy 

First Rud. 

Second Gram. First French 

Second Gram. Second French 

Freshman Third German 

Second Rud. 

Second Gram. Second French 

Special Latin Third French 

Third Gram. Third French 

Second Gram. Second French 

Philosophy 

Third Gram. 

Special Latin 



Third French 
Second Ger. 

Anal. Chem. 
First French 
Third French 
Second French 
Third French 
Third French 
Third French 

Third French 
Second French 
Second French 
Third French 






Third French 
Second French 
Second French 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 



Physics 
Calculus 
First Algebra 

Second Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Physics 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
P'irst Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
First Arithmetic 
Physics 

First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Physics 
Geometry 
Descript. Geometry 

Descript. Geometry 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Physics 
Geometry 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Physics 

Second Arithmetic 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Second Mathematics 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



•4 



Coleman, James I. 

Collins, Cornelius V. 

Collins, James E. 

Conlin, Thomas A. 

Conner, George H. 

Connor, Joseph A. 

Connolly, James F. 

Connolly, Martin J. 

Conway, James F. 
^£onway, Walter G. 
>>Corbett, Francis J. 

Corbett, Frederick A. 

Corcoran / Joseph A. 

Costello, Edward A. 
"**Costello, Francis M. 

Coveney, Denis J. 

Coveney, Francis X. 
yCoveney, Philip 

Coveney, Robert W. 
7 Cowhig, John J. 
■^Coyle, George N. 

Coyne, Bartholomew B. 

Coyne, Lawrence J. 

Coyne, Leonard S. 

Craig, George J. 

Craig, John W. 

Creagh, Henry J. 

Creed, William C. 

• Croker, Henry C. 
Croker, Robert E. 

-^Cronin, Patrick D. J. 
^Crotty, John P. 

Crowley, Edward F. 
^Crowley, Joseph F. 
v^Crowley, Joseph L. 
\L Crowley, Timothy W. 

Crowley, William D. 

Cuddihy, Francis N. 

Cullen, Maurice F. 

Cummings, Eugene B. 
YCummings, John J. 
^Cunningham, Edward A. 

Cunningham, George W, 

Cunningham, Wilfred B 

Curry, Arthur L. 
^Curry, William T. 
"^Cussen, Joseph P. 

•^-Dacey, Edward A. 
>CDaignault, Elphege J. 
»-Daley, Charles P. 
<Daly, Edmund D. 

Day, William J. 
^Dean, Frederick J. 
^Dee, William H. 
Delaney, John P. 
^-Devaney, Patrick A. 
->WDever, Martin D. 

• Devlin, Joseph H. 
Does, Edwin P. 



First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Third Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Third Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Special Latin 
Sophomore 
Special Latin 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Freshman 
Special Latin 
Philosophy 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Rhetoric 
Special Eng. 
Philosophy 
Rhetoric 
Freshman 
Sophomore 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Special Latin 
Second Gram. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Sophomore 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 

Freshman 
Sophomore 
Freshman 
Rhetoric 
Rhetoric 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
vSpecial Latin 
Special Eng. 
Special Eng. 
Rhetoric 



Third French 

Third French 

Second French 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Second French 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Third French 
Third French 
First French 
Third German 



Third French 
Third French 
Second French 
Second French 
Anal. Chem. 
First French 

Anal. Chem. 
First French 

First French 
Second French 
Second French 
Second French 
Second French 



Gen'l Chem. 

First French 
Second French 
First French 
Second French 

First French 
Gen'l Chem. 
First French 
Anal. Chem. 
Anal. Chem. 

First French 
Second French 
Third French 
Third French 
Third French 
Anal. Chem. 



First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Second Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Second Arithmetic 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

Second Mathematics 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

Second Mathematics 

Geometry 

Calculus 

First Algebra 

Descript. Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Geometry 

Second Mathematics 

Second Algebra 

Physics 

First Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

Calculus 

Geometry 

Physics 

Descript. Geometry 

vSecond Mathematics 

Calculus 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

Geometry 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

First Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Geometry 

First Algebra 

Geometry 

Geometry 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 

Second Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



><Doherty, Francis J. 
)oherly, Henry A. 

.Dolahar, John A. 

.Doland, Franklin P. 

^Donahue, Arthur J. 

Donnelly, James A. 

Donnelly, Joseph R. 
^ Donohoe, Thomas J. 
^Donovan, Jeremiah J. 
( Dore, Ambrose A. 
^Dore, Francis J. 
-^Douglass, James A. 
)*Doyle, James A. 
>t>oyle, John B. 
^Drey, James F. 

Driscoll, De Courcey J. 

Driscoll, James W. 
*<Drum, Hugh A. 

Duffy, Bernard F. 

Duffy, Charles F. 

Duffy, James B. 

Duffy, John F. 

Duffy, Joseph M. 

Duffy, William J. 

Dunne, John T. 

^Enwright, Francis X. 
vEpp, Hugo J. 

^Fagan, Arthur M. 

Fallon, James J. 

Fallon, Joseph D. 

Farrell, Arthur L. 

Farrell, Edward P. 

Farrell, William J. 

Fay, Martin C. 

Feeley, Eugene J. 

Feeley, Michael W. 

Fegan, Edward J. 

Ferguson, Hugh F. 
-yFinigan, William B. 
yFinn, Charles A. 
-/Finn, Charles M. 

Fitzpatrick, Francis J. 

Fitzpatrick, Francis X. 

Fitzpatrick, Vincent J. 

Flanagin, Walter L. 

Flatley, Thomas W. 
XsFlinn, Thomas 
Y-Flood, George P. 
'^lynn, James J. 

'Flynn, Maurice F. 

Fogarty, Arthur H. 
^-Fogarty, Walter N. 
/Foley, Daniel A. 
~Jb'oley, Thomas S. 

Ford, Thomas J. 
xForrest, William H. 
^ox, John M. 
"HFraher, Edward J. 
-'French, Herbert C. 
-Fulton, David H. 



Special Eng. 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


First Algebra 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 
Gen'l Chem. 


Geometry 


Second Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


Special Latin 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


First Algebra 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


Philosophy 




Physics 


Freshman 


Third French 


First Algebra 


Third Gram. 


Third German 


First Algebra 


Rhetoric 


Anal. Chem. 


Descript. Geometry 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


First Algebra 


Second Gram. 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Freshman 


First German 


Geometry 


Freshman 


Third German 


Geometry 


Philosophy 




Physics 


Rhetoric 


Anal. Chem. 


Descript. Geometry 


Philosophy 




Physics 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Sophomore 




Second Mathematics 


First Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


First Rud. 




vSecond Algebra 


First Rud. 




Second Algebra 


Third Gram. 


Third German 


First Arithmetic 


First Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Geometry 


Philosophy 




Physics 


Sophomore 






Philosophy 




Physics 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Rhetoric 


Anal. Chem. 


Calculus 


Special Latin 


Third French 


Geometry 


Second Gram. 


Second Ger. 


First Algebra 


First Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


Rhetoric 


•Anal. Chem. 


Calculus 


Freshman 


First French 


Second Mathematics 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Descript. Geometry 


Special Eng. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Special Latin 


Third French 


Geometry 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


First Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Second Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Second Gram 


. Second Ger. 


Geometry 


Philosophy 




Physics 


vSophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Second Algebra 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Descript. Geometry 


Third Gram. 


Third French 


Geometry 


Special Eng. 


Third German 


Second Algebra 


First Rud. 




First Arithmetic 


Special Latin 


Second French 


Geometry 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


Sophomore 


Gen'l Chem. 


Second Mathematics 


First Rud. 




Second Algebra 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 



_y^Gaffney, James F. 

Gallagher, Charles A. 

Gallagher, Daniel F. 

Gallagher, James C. 
-x. Gallagher, John V. 

Garrahan, Thomas C. 

Gately, George A. 

Gately, Matthias J. 
^Gavin, Basil S. 
^Gearin, Thomas C. 
•^Gibbons, Michael S. 
^^Gifford, Irving L. 
■AMU, Walter H. 
"^Gillan, Joseph J. 

Gillespie, William J. 

Glover, Francis J. 
-Gookin, P^dward R. 
~^Grady, Thomas J. 

Grainger, P^dward J. 
^Grainger, George L. 
>^Green, Alfred A. 
><Green, James J. 
^^Green, John P. 

Green, John R. 

Green, Thomas M. 

V4rlagerty, Peter A. 
T^JPaggerty, Francis 
— ^Harney, Robert A. 

Hartigan, James A. 

Hartigan, Jeremiah F. 

Hartnett, John J. 

Hayes, John J. 
^Hennelly, Edward J. 

Hennelly, Thomas P. 

Hennessey, John F. 

Hernandez, Eleuterio 
C. V. 
>*Hertig, Joseph A. 
"T^Hession, Thomas P. 
*?Higgins, Aloysius T. 
y^Higgins, Patrick J. 
> £Higgins, Philip M. 
>4iodgkinson, Eugene A. 
-^Holland, William J. 
^Horan, Patrick J. 
>CHurley, John C. 
-rCHurley, William J. 

Jameson, Thomas B. 
Johnson, Charles A. 
Jones, James D. 
*Joyce, Edward J. 
■J- Joyce, James H. 

Kane, Henry J. 

^Keefe, William D. 
-yKelley, Vincent L. 
,^/Kelly, Henry J. 

* Died January 25 



Special Eng. 
First Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Philosophy 
Philosophy 
Freshman 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Second Rud. 
Sophomore 
Second Rud. 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
First Rud. 
Philosophy 
Philosophy 
Sophomore 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Philosophy 

Special Latin 
Special Eng. 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Rhetoric 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Special Latin 

First Rud. 
First Rud. 
P'reshman 
First Rud. 
Second Rud. 
Third Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 



Third French 

Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 



First French 



Gen'l Chem. 



Third French 



Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Third German 
Second French 
Second French 



Second French 
Second French 
Second French 
Second Ger. 
Second Ger. 
First French 
Anal. Chem. 
Second French 
Second French 
Second French 



First French 



Third French 

Third French 
First French 

Third French 



Sophomore Gen'l Chem. 
Third Gram. Third French 
Third Gram. Third French 
Freshman P A irst French 

Special Latin Third French 



Second Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Descript. Geometry 

Physics 

Physics 

Second Mathematics 

First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

Second Arithmetic 

Second Mathematics 

Second Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

Physics 

Physics 

Second Mathematics 

Second Algebra 

Second Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

First Algebra 

Ph)^sics 

Geometry 

Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
First Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 
Geometry 
Geometry 
Geometry 

First Arithmetic 
Second Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Second Arithmetic 
Geometry 
First Arithmetic 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
Geometry 

Second Mathematics 
Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Geometry 



Special Eng. { ££^& Physics 

First Rud. First Arithmetic 

Sophomore Gen'l Chem. Calculus 

Third Gram. Third French Geometry 



IO 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 



^ Kelly, John J. 
y< Kelly, William J. 
-* Kelly, William P. 
^Kendregan, J. Herbert 

Kenney, James J. 

Kenny, Richard H. 

Keogh, Joseph L. 

Kernan, John W. 

Kerrigan, Michael J. 

Kiley, Charles J. 
XKillilea, William G. 
V^Kimball, Charles L. 
^^Koen, William H. 

yiyandrigan, James T. 
sXarkin, Michael A. 
n. La veil e, Thomas J. 
V Lawless, Nicholas S. 

Leahy, Albert M. 

Lee, Jeremiah 
><Lennon, Joseph A. 
xXenthier, Amand A. 
VLinehan, Jerome C. 

Logue, Charles E. 

Long, William J. 
VLorenz, Martin A. 
^oughry, Joseph P. 
-/iyydon, Patrick J. 
v-Lynch, Daniel J. 
--'Lynch, Daniel L. 

Lynch, Dennis J. 

*Lynch, John A. 

Lynch, Joseph P. 

Lyons, Joseph P. 
•/-Lyons, Joseph V. 

V-Macdonald, A. E. Ar- 
chibald 
4. MacNeill, Francis A. 
-^.Madden, John C. . 
> Madden, John F. 

Maguire, Charles J. 

Maguire, Dennis J. 
-^Maguire, Edward L. 
"*Mahan, George B. 
"/Mahoney, Bradford B. 
' Mahoney, Francis A. 
VMahony, Charles F. 
■^ Maloney, James 
^Maney, Clement J. 
"<Maney, Louis. 
y Manning, Thomas J. 
"^Manning, William H. 

Martin, Alfred 

Martin, Arthur P. 

McCabe, Denis A. 
^McCafferty, Charles J. 
^McCarthy, Charles C. 
'^McCarthy, John J. 
^McCarthy, Joseph A. 
* Died January 19 



Freshman 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Special Latin 
Philosophy 
Special Eng. 
Special Eng. 
Special Eng. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Special Latin 

Philosophy 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Rhetoric 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Sophomore 
Freshman 
Rhetoric 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 



Special Eng. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Rhetoric 
Philosophy 
Sophomore 
First Rud. 
Third Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Second Gram. 
Special Eng. 
Second Gram. 
Anal. Chem. 
P A irst Rud. 
Second Rud. 
First Rud. 
Special Eng. 



First French 

Third French 
First French 
Third French 
Second French 

Third French 

Third French 
Third French 
First French 
Gen'l Chem. 



First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Physics 



Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Anal. Chem. 



Second Arithmetic 

Geometry 

Second Mathematics 

Geometry 

Physics 
First Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 
Descript. Geometry 
First Arithmetic 
First Arithmetic 



Second French First Algebra 



Second French 
Third French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Second Ger. 
Anal. Chem. 

Second French 

First French 
Second Ger. 
First French 
Third French 
Third French 



Anal. Chem. 

Gen'l Chem. 

Second French 

Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Third French 



Second French 
Third French 
Second French 
First French 



First French 



Second Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Geometry 

Second Mathematics 
First Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
First Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 



Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Second Algebra 
Calculus 
Physics 
First Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 

Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
Geometry 
Second Arithmetic 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
Second Arithmetic 
First Algebra 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



11 



^'McCarthy, Patrick J. 
yc McCarthy, William F. 
viMcCarty, James E. 

McColgan, John C. 

McCormick, John B. 
XMcCusker, William P. 
^McCrystal, Francis J. 
>JVtcDermod, William M 
/McBlaney, Hugh J. 

McGaffigan, Bernard F. 

McGillicuddy, Denis J. 

XMcGlinchey, Joseph F. 

VMcGoldrick, Edward J. 

McGovern, James L. 
y McGrath, Edward C. 

McGrath, Hugh C. 

McGrath, J. Francis. 

McGrath, John F. 

McGuire, Thomas F. 

McHugh, Thomas F. 

McKenna, Thomas W. 

fcLaughlin, George A. 
cMorrow, James J. 
^cNaraara, William F. 
>Meauey, Joseph S. 
Merrill, John H. 
Miley, Daniel P. 
^Miller, William T. 
yMinigan, Michael J. 
VMitchell, Walter J. 
/Moore, Frederick F. 
Moore, Joseph 
Moran, Edmund F. 
Moran, James P. 
y Morgan, Daniel J. 

Moriarty, Henry C. 
^Moriarty, Jeremiah F. 
VMorley, Francis A. 
Morton, James T. 
Mullaney, John M. 
\Mullen, James E. 
VMullen, John F. 
Mullin, Edward T. 
Mullin, Francis R. 
VMulroy, James T. 

Mulvaney, James F. 
N^Mulvey, Frederick J. 
Murdock, James M. 
Murphy, Charles A. 
^Murphy, Edward W. 
^Murphy, Frederic 
"* Murphy, George A. 
^Murphy, James C. 
y Murphy, John J. 
^^Murphy, John J. 
Murphy, John T. 
Murphy, Michael J. 
^Murphy, Patrick W. 
^jMurphy, Stephen F. 
^Murphy, William E. 
' Murphy, William L. 



Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Second Gram. 
F A irst Rud. 
Third Gram. 
Freshman 
First Rud. 
Sophomore 
Special Eng. 
vSpecial Latin 
Freshman 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Sophomore 
Rhetoric 
Philosophy 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Freshman 
First Rud. 
Sophomore 
Special Eng. 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 
Sophomore 
Second Gram. 
Special Eng. 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Philosophy 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 



F'irst French 
Third French 
Second French 
Third French 
Second Ger. 

Third French 
First French 

Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Second Ger. 
First French 
vSecond French 
First F A rench 
First French 
Second French 

Gen'l Chem. 
Gen'l Chem. 
Anal. Chem. 

Second French 
First French 
Third French 
Second French 
Second French 

First French 
Second French 

Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Third French 
Third French 



Second French 
Third French 
Second French 

Third French 
Third French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Second French 



First French 
Second French 
Third French 
Third German 
Third FYench 
First French 
vSecond French 
Third French 
Third F A rench 



Third French 
First French 



Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

Descript. Geometry 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

First Algebra 

Second Algebra 

First Algebra 

Second Mathematics 

Geometry 

Geometry 

F'irst Algebra 

Geometry 

Second Mathematics 

Physics 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

Geometry 

Second Algebra 

Descript. Geometry 

Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

First Algebra 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

Second Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

Descript. Geometry 

First Algebra 

Physics 

First Arithmetic 

First Algebra 

Geometry 

Geometry 

Second Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

First Algebra 

vSecond Mathematics 

Second Algebra 

Geometry 

F'irst Arithmetic 

Physics 

First Arithmetic 

Second Algebra 

First Algebra 



12 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 



'^Murray, Francis A. 
>CMurray, John F. 
^Murray, Leo F. J. 
^JMyers, Arthur L. 

Nolan, Edward A. 
Nolan, Louis P. 
Noonan, Edward J. 
Noonan, Kaen A. 
Norris, Cornelius J. 
Nugent, William D. 

O'Brien, Charles A. 
- O'Brien, Charles T. 
-. O'Brien, Edward A. 
. O'Brien, Jeremiah A. 

O'Brien, John J. 

O'Brien, John P. 
. O'Brien, William E. 

O'Brien, William H. 
7-O'Connell, Daniel J. 
y^O'Connell, Frederick P. 
4 O'Connell, J. Augustus 
/ O'Connell, James E. 

O'Connor, Charles H. 

O'Connor, Timothy M. 

O'Donnell, James A. 
^O'Donnell, William F. 
J O'Hanlon, Henry 

O'Hara, James W. 

O'Hara, John J. 

O'Hare, John J. 

O'Hearn, Tames A. 

O'Hern, Daniel J. 

O'Kane, Joseph C. 

O'Keefe, Thomas F. 

O'Leary, Michael J. 
KO'Neil, Leo F. 
-O'Reilly, Joseph T. 

O'Reilly, William F. 

Peard, William A. 
Pelletier, Victor M. 
Phimi, John J. 
Powers, John E. 
Powers, Joseph L. 
Prendergast, Daniel J. 
Prendergast, John B. 

U Quigley, George H. 
<? Quin, William J. 
Ouinn, John S. 

y Randall, Roy McG. 
'CReade, Francis L. 

Reardon, John A. 

Regan, John D. 

Regan, Peter L. 

Reilly, Joseph A. 

Renaud, Emile E. 

Renaud, J. Louis 



Second Rud. Second Arithmetic 

First Rud. Second Arithmetic 

First Rud. First Arithmetic 

Second Gram. Second French Geometry 

First Rud. First Arithmetic 

Second Gram. First French Geometry 
Second Gram. Second Ger. First Algebra 
Third Gram. Third French Second Algebra 
Freshman Second French First Algebra 
Rhetoric Anal. Chem. Second Mathematics 



Rhetoric 
Philosophy 
First Rud. 
Philosophy 
Second Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Special Eng. 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Sophomore 
Second Gram. 
Special Latin 
Second Gram. 
Second Rud. 
Rhetoric 
Philosophy 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Sophomore 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Special Latin 



Special Eng. 
FresHman 
Special Latin 
Third Gram. 
Rhetoric 
Second Gram. 
Rhetoric 

Sophomore 
Third Gram. 
Sophomore 

Special Latin 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Special Latin 
Freshman 



Anal. Chem. 



Second French 
Third French 
Third French 



Third French 



Second French 
Third French 
Second French 

Anal. Chem. 

Gen'l Chem. 
Gen'l Chem. 
Gen'l Chem. 

Second French 

First French 
Second French 
Third French 
Anal. Chem. 



Physics 

First Arithmetic 
Physics 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
First Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
Second Mathematics 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
Second Mathematics 
Physics 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Mathematics 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 



Second French Geometry 

First French First Algebra 

Third French First Algebra 

Third German Second Algebra 

Anal. Chem. Calculus 

Second French Geometry 

Anal. Chem. Descript. Geometry 



Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Gen'l Chem. 

Third French 
Second French 
First French 
Third French 
First French 
Third French 
First French 



First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Second Mathematics 

Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
First Algebra 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



13 



Reynolds, John T. 
Rich, William J. 
Riley, John C. 
Roche, Walter J. 
Rockett, Joseph B. 
Rooney, Henry M. 
Rooney, William S. 
>C Rourke, James C. 

• Ruddy, John J. 
Russell. James D. 
Ruth, William A. 

-*-Ryan, David D. 

Ryan, Edward F. 
- Ryan, Edward F. 
Ryan, Joseph A. 
Ryan, Stephen F. 

■^-Sartoris, Herman J. 
>Scollin, Walter J. 

Scott, Henry L. 

Scully, George E. 

• Sennott, John R. 
Sexton, Cornelius J. 
Shanahan, Timothy J. 
Shea, Joachim P. 
Shealey, Michael J. 

KShean, Patrick T. 
VShean, William T. 

Sheanon, Joseph P. 

Sheehan, John J. 
^Sheehan, John P. 
V Sheehan, Joseph T. 
'^Shields, George C. 

vShort, Edward P. 

Skulley, Walter E. 

Sliney, Edmund C. 

Spelman, Thomas M. 

Splaine, Richard H. 

vSplaine, Richard H. 

Sullivan, Augustus L. 

Sullivan, Edward M. 

Sullivan, John C. 

Sullivan, John H. 
S45ullivan, John H. 
X$ullivan, John J. 
«<Sullivan, Leo A. 
Sullivan, Samuel L. 

Sullivan, Timothy John 
J Sullivan, Timothy 

Joseph 
v^Supple, David G. 
4 Supple, James A. 
-^ Sweeney, Michael T. 
Y- Swift, John E. 

"^feeling, Benjamin F. 
WTeeling, Richard S. 
^Thompson, Louis T. 
>Tierney, William E. 
^■Tolan, Joseph I. 
-yJToohey, George A. 






Second Rud. 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
Freshman 
First Rud. 
Philosophy 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Philosophy 
Special Latin 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Freshman 
Third Gram. 
First Rud, 

Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Freshman 
First Rud. 

Second Rud. 
Sophomore 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Freshman 
First Rud. 
Rhetoric 
Philosophy 
Second Gram. 
Special Eng. 
Freshman 
Second Gram. 
Second Gram. 
Sophomore 
Philosophy 
First Rud. 
Freshman 
Sophomore 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
Third Gram. 
First Rud. 
Special Latin 
First Rud. 
First Rud. 

First Rud. 
Philosophy 
Sophomore 
Second Grain. 
Rhetoric 



First French 
Third French 
First French 



Third German 
Third French 



Third French 
First French 
First French 
Second French 
Third French 



Second French 
Second French 



Anal. Chem. 

Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 

First French 
First French 

Anal. Chem. 

Second Ger. 
Third French 
First French 
Second French 
Second French 
Gen'l Chem. 



First French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Third French 
Third French 
Third French 

Third French 



Second Arithmetic 

Second Mathematics 

Geometry 

First Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

Physics 

Geometry 

Geometry 

First Arithmetic 

Physics 

Second Algebra 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

First Algebra 

Second Algebra 

First Arithmetic 

Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 

First Arithmetic 
Second Mathematics 
vSecond Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 
Physics 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Descript. Geometry 
First Algebra 
Geometry 

Second Mathematics 
Physics 

First Arithmetic 
First Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Algebra 
Geometry 
Geometry 
Second Algebra 
Second Algebra 
First Arithmetic 
First Arithmetic 



Second Arithmetic 

Physics 
Gen'l Chem. Calculus 
Second French First Algebra 
Anal. Chem. Second Mathematics 



Philosophy Physics 

Rhetoric Anal. Chem. Descript. Geometry 

First Rud. Second Algebra 

Second Gram. Second French First Algebra 
Third Gram. Third French Second Algebra 
Second Rud. Second Arithmetic 



14 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



Toohey, Thomas V. 
Toohig, William F. 
Tosney, John G. 
Trainor, Lawrence A. 
Treanor, James J. 

Vaas, Henry J. 
Vincent, Joseph L. 

v Walsh, John F. 
V Walsh, Walter J. 

Ward, George E. 

Waul, Robert F. 

Wellings, William E. 

Welsh, Martin J. 
y Wessling, Henry J. 
y Wessling, Joseph F. 
>^Williams, Francis A. 
>cWilliams, Henry J. 
jCWilliams, Joseph R. 
XWhite, Arthur J. 
>Woodis, John J. 



Third Gram. Third French Geometry 
Sophomore Gen'l Chem. Second Algebra 
Second Gram. Second French First Algebra 
Freshman First French First Algebra 

First Rud. First Arithmetic 

Special Eng. Second Ger. First Arithmetic 
Second Gram. Second French Second Mathematics 



Gen'l Chem. 



Second French 
First French 
Gen'l Chem. 
Gen'l Chem. 
First French 



Sophomore 
First Rud. 
vSecond Gram 
Freshman A 
Special Eng. 
Sophomore 
Freshman 
First Rud. 

Second Gram. Second French 
Second Rud. 

Rhetoric Anal. Chem. 

Philosophy 

Freshman First French 

Total number of students 477. 



Calculus 
First Arithmetic 
Geometry 
First Algebra 
Second Algebra 
Second Mathematics 
Second Mathematics 
First Arithmetic 
vSecond Algebra 
Second Arithmetic 
Second Mathematics 
Physics 
First Algebra 



Catalogue of Classes. 

1897-1S98. 



Philosophy* 



Ahem, Timothy J. 
Bergin, Thomas F. 
Brewin, John A. 
Burns, James T. 
Carney, Francis J. 
Chapman, Daniel J. 
Coyne, Bartholomew B. 
Croker, Eobert E. 
Dore, Francis J. 
Duffy, Charles F. 
Duffy, John F. 
Farrell, Arthur L\ 
Farrell, William J. 
Flynn, Maurice F. 
Gallagher, John V. 
Garrahan, Thomas C. 
Grady, Thomas J. 
Grainger, Edward J. 
Green, Thomas M. 
Keogh, Joseph L. 
Landrigan, James T. 
Maguire, Charles J. 
McLaughlin, George A, 
Murphy, Patrick W. 
O'Brien, Charles T. 
O'Brien, Jeremiah A. 
O'Hara, James W. 
Rooney, Henry M. 
Russell, James D. 
Sheehan, John P. 
Splaine, Richard H. 
Supple, David G. 
Teeling, Benjamin F. 
White, Arthur J. 



Cady, Joseph P. 
Creed, William C. 
Cronin, Patrick D. J. 



Rhetoric* 



Roxbury 
Waltham 
Marlboro 
Roxbury 
Cambridgeport 
South Boston 
Boston 

Weymouth Centre 
Roxbury 
South Boston 
South Boston 
Cambridge 
South Boston 
East Boston 
Milford 

South Framingham 
Boston 
East Boston 
Roxbury 
Boston 
Boston 
Brighton 
Dorchester 
Canton 
Woburn 
Salem 
Boston 
Cambridge 
Boston 
Winchester 
Watertown 
Holliston 
Charlestown 
Dorchester 



East Boston 
South Boston 
Dorchester 



i6 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



Daly, Edmund D. 
Day, William J. 
Does, Edwin P. 
Doyle, John B. 
Duffy, James B. 
Feeley, Eugene J. 
Finn, Charles A. 
Hayes, John J. 
Lawless, Nicholas S. 
Loughry, Joseph P. 
Madden, John F. 
McKenna, Thomas W. 
Nugent, William D. 
O'Brien, Charles A. 
O'Hanlon, Henry 
Powers, Joseph L. 
Prendergast, John B. 
Sheehan, John J. 
Swift, John E. 
Teeling, Richard S. 
Williams, Joseph R. 



Allchin, Frederic J. 
Barnes, James T. 
Corbett, Frederick A. 
Crowley, Edward F. 
Daignault, Elphege J. 
Dolahar, John A. 
Donovan, Jeremiah J. 
Dore, Ambrose A. 
Drey, James F. 
Duffy, William J. 
Fallon, Joseph D. 
Farrell, Edward P. 
Finigan, William B. 
Fitzpatrick, Francis X. 
Foley, Daniel A. 
Gill, Walter H. 
Kelley, Vincent L. 
Lavelle, Thomas J. 
Long, William J. 
Maguire, Dennis J. 
McGaffigan, Bernard F. 
McHugh, Thomas F. 
O'Connell, James E. 
Quigley, George H. 
Quinn, John S. 
Spelman, Thomas M. 



Newton Upper Falls 

South Boston 

Boston 

South Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

Dedham 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Watertown 

Waltham 

Waltham 

Milford 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Arlington 

Charlestown 

West Quincy 

Milford 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 



Sophomore A. 



Jamaica Plain 

Watertown 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 

Woonsocket, R. I. 

Boston 

Randolph 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Milton 

South Boston 

Cambridge 

Concord 

Roxbury 

Boston 

East Boston 

Charlestown 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Saxonville 

Charlestown 

Woburn 

Dorchester 

Brighton 

Boston 

Newton 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



17 



Toohig, William F. 
Walsh, John F. 
Welsh, Martin J. 



East Watertown 
Dorchester 
North Cambridge 



Sophomore B» 



Coleman, David C. 
Conway, James F. 
Costello, Edward A. 
Coveney, Denis J. 
Cunningham, Edward A. 
Doherty, Henry A. 
Donnelly, James A. 
Fogarty, Arthur H. 
Fraher, Edward J. 
French, Herbert C. 
Gallagher, James C. 
Grainger, George L. 
Jameson, Thomas B. 
Mahony, Charles F. 
Moore, Joseph 
Mullin, Francis R. 
McGuire, Thomas F. 
O'Hearn, James A. 
Shanahan, Timothy J. 
Sullivan, Edward M. 
Supple, James A. 



Cahill, James I. 
Cowhig, John J. 
Creagh, Henry J. 
Crowley, Joseph F. 
Cunningham, Wilfred B. 
Dacey, Edward A. 
Dee, William H. 
Drum, Hugh A. 
Duffy, Bernard F. 
Hession, Thomas P, 
Hurley, John C. 
* Joyce, Edward J. 
Kelly, John J. 
Kendregan, J. Herbert 
Lynch, Dennis J. 
Minigan, Michael J. 
Mitchell, Walter J. 
Morley, Francis A. 
Murphy, Charles A. 
McCarthy, Patrick J. 
*Died January 25. 



Beverly 

South Boston 

Auburndale 

Hyde Park 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Somerville 

Roxbury 

East Weymouth 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

East Boston 

Everett 

Boston 

West Canaan, N. H. 

Cambridgeport 

Cambridge 

Hyde Park 

Charlestown 

Ipswich 

Holliston 



Freshman A. 



Brookline 

Revere 

Wakefield 

East Boston 

Cambridge 

South Boston 

Concord 

Boston 

South Boston 

Dorchester 

Charlestown 

Newton 

Dorchester. 

Brockton 

Charlestown 

Beverly 

Somerville 

Chelsea 

Dorchester 

Hyde Park 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



McDermod, William M, 
McGoldrick, Edward J. 
O'Connell, Daniel J. 
Regan, Peter L. 
Renaud, J. Louis 
Ryan, David D. 
Ryan, Edward F. 
Ryan, Edward F. 
Shean, Patrick T. 
Shean, William T. 
Short, Edward P. 
Waul, Robert F. 
Woodis, John J. 



Andrews, Frederick L. 
Brennan, Dennis M. 
Browne, Francis A. 
Callahan, Dennis E. 
Carney, Albert S. 
Crotty, John P. 
Curry, William T. 
Daley, Charles P. 
Douglass, James A. 
Finn, Charles M. 
Gately, George A. 
Hartigan, Jeremiah F. 
Hartnett, John J. 
Horan, Patrick J. 
Kimball, Charles L. 
Lorenz, Martin A. 
Lynch, Joseph P. 
Murdock, James M. 
Murphy, James C. 
Murphy, William L. 
McGrath, Edward C. 
McGrath, Hugh C. 
McNamara, William F. 
Norris, Cornelius J. 
O'Hara, John J. 
O'Hara, John J. 
O'Leary, Michael J. 
Pelletier, Victor M. 
Reardon, John A. 
Rich, William J. 
Roche, Walter J. 
Scott, Henry L. 
Sullivan, Augustus L. 
Trainor, Lawrence A. 
Wessling, Henry J. 



Maiden 

Cambridge 

Roxbury 

East Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Newton Upper Falls 

Lynn 

Belmont 

Belmont 

Hudson 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 



Freshman B. 



Chelsea 

Charlestown 

Randolph 

South Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Charlestown 

Roxbury 

Belmont 

East Boston 

Chelsea 

Boston 

Roslindale 

Marlboro 

Jamaica Plain 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Norwood 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Boston 

North Easton 

Salem 

Quincy 

Dedham 

Readville 

Boston 

Allston 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Cochituate 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Roxbury 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



19 



First Academic A. # 



Breen, James H. 
Brown, George B. 
Buckley, John C. 
Callahan, Henry A. 
Carroll, Daniel J. 
Carroll, Felix F. 
Corbett, Francis J. 
Craig, John W. 
Curry, Arthur L. 
Delaney, John P. 
Flynn, James J. 
Gallagher, Daniel F. 
Harney, Robert A. 
Hennelly, Edward J. 
Manning, William H. 
Martin, Arthur P. 
McGrath, John F. 
Nolan, Louis P. 
Noonan, Edward J. 
O'Connor, Charles H. 
Prendergast, Daniel J. 
Reade, Francis L. 
Scollin, Walter J. 
Sliney, Edmund C. 
Sweeney, Michael T. 
Tierney, William E. 
Vincent, Joseph L. 
Ward, George E. 



Hudson 

Watertown 

Canton 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Jamaica Plain 

Hyde Park 

Boston 

Roxbury 

South Boston 

Roslindale 

Quincy 

Boston 

Waltham 

Roslindale 

West Newton 

Kingston 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

East Weymouth 

Dorchester 

Waltham 

East Saugus 

Wakefield 

North Weymouth 

Holbrook 

Somerville 

Canton 



First Academic B. 



# 



Brown, Lewis H. 
Burke, Thomas J. 
Connolly, James F. 
Corcoran, Joseph A. 
Costello, Francis M. 
Crowley, Joseph L. 
Crowley, Timothy W. 
Cuddihy, Francis N. 
Cussen, Joseph P. 
Driscoll, De Courcey J. 
Fegan, Edward J. 
Green, John P. 
Green, John R. 
Hartigan, James A, 
Hennelly, Thomas P. 
Larkin, Michael A. 
Lennon, Joseph A. 

*First Academic was formerly known as 
of Students is arranged according to the old 



Jamaica Plain 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Holliston 

Quincy 

Charlestown 

East Boston 

Roslindale 

Waltham 

East Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Second Grammar. The Catalogue 
nomenclature. 



20 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



Linehan, Jerome C. 
*Lynch, John A. 
Mahoney, Francis A. 
Merrill, John H. 
Mulroy, James T. 
Murphy, John J. 
Myers, Arthur L. 
McCarty, James E. 
McCormick, John B. 
McGrath, J. Francis 
McMorrow, James J. 
O'Brien, John J. 
O'Donnell, James A. 
O'Neil, Leo F. 
Sartoris, Herman J. 
Sheehan, Joseph T. 
Skulley, Walter E. 
Tosney, John G. 
Williams, Francis A. 

Second 

Blackwell, Hugh L. 
Burke, Richard S. 
Callahan, William J. 
Collins, James E. 
Conner, George H. 
Doyle, James A. 
Driscoll, James W. 
Fagan, Arthur M. 
Fitzpatrick, Francis J. 
Flatley, Thomas W. 
Foley, Thomas S. 
Jones, James D. 
Kelly, Henry J. 
Kenney, James J. 
Logue, Charles E. 
Mahan, George B. 
Meaney, Joseph S. 
Morgan, Daniel J. 
Morton, James T. 
Mullaney, John M. 
Murphy, Edward W. 
McColgan, John C. 
O'Connell, Frederick P. 
Quin, William J. 
Reilly, Joseph A. 
Riley, John C. 
Rooney, William S. 

*Died January 19. 
fSecond Academic was formerly 
of Students is arranged according to 



Cambridge 

Jamaica Plain 

Chelsea 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

Roxbury 

Lynn 

Roxbury 

Natick 

Jamaica Plain 

Chelsea 

Newton 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Wakefield 

Chelsea 

Boston 



Academic A*f 



Boston 

Dorchester 

Abington 

Newton 

Jamaica Plain 

Brookline 

Lynn 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Boston 

Newton 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

South Boston 

Mattapan 

Charlestown 

Canton 

East Boston 

Dorchester 

Cambridge 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 



known as Third Grammar, 
the old nomenclature. 



The Catalogue 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 



21 



Shea, Joachim P. 


Boston 


Tolan, Joseph I. 


Boston 


Toohey, Thomas V. 


Roxbury 


Second Academic B. 


Bennett, Charles A. 


East Boston 


Bowman, David L. 


Lynn 


Burns, Malachi J. 


Roxbury 


Colahan, James A. 


Roxbury 


Coveney, Philip 


Hyde Park 


Coveney, Robert W. 


Dorchester 


Craig, George J. 


Boston 


Donohue, Thomas J. 


South Boston 


Duffy, Joseph M. 


South Boston 


Fay, Martin C. 


Roxbury 


Fogarty, Walter N. 


Roxbury 


Green, Alfred A. 


East Boston 


Green, James J. 


Lynn 


Higgins, Philip M. 


Roxbury 


Hurley, William J. 


East Boston 


Johnson, Charles A. 


South Boston 


Lyons, Joseph V. 


South Boston 


Maloney, James 


Dorchester 


Maney, Clement J. 


Woburn 


Miley, Daniel P. 


Dorchester 


Mullin, Edward T. 


Cambridgeport 


Murphy, Frederic 


West Stoughton 


Murphy, John J. 


Charlestown 


Murphy, John T. 


Brookline 


McCarthy, William F. 


Cambridge 


McCrystal, Francis J. 


East Boston 


Noonan, Kaen A. 


Roxbury 


O'Brien, John P. 


Roxbury 


Powers, John E. 


Boston 


Regan, John D. 


Dorchester 


Rourke, James C. 


East Boston 


Ryan, Joseph A. 


Waltham 


Sullivan, John C. 


Norwood 


Sullivan, John H. 


Boston 


Sullivan, John H. 


Boston 


First Rudiments A* 


Bouffard, Alfred L. 


Hyde Park 


Coleman, James I. 


Boston 


Cunningham, George W. 


Brookline 


Dean, Frederick J. 


Chelsea 


Dunne, John T. 


Newton 


Epp, Hugo J. 


Boston 


Fallon, James J. 


Jamaica Plain 



22 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 



Ferguson, Hugh F. 
Flinn, Thomas 
Forrest, William H. 
Gallagher, Charles A. 
Gookin, Edward R. 
Hernandez, Eleuterio C. V. 
Hertig, Joseph A. 
Higgins, Aloysius T. 
Keefe, William D. 
Kelly, William J. 
Lee, Jeremiah 
Lydon, Patrick J. 
Manning, Thomas J. 
Miller, William T. 
Moore, Frederick F. 
Moriarty, Henry C. 
Moriarty, Jeremiah F. 
Murphy, Stephen F. 
Murray, John F. 
McCarthy, John J. 
O'Brien, William H. 
Rockett, Joseph B. 
Ruddy, John J. 
Sheanon, Joseph P. 
Splaine, Richard H. 
Sullivan, Timothy John 
Sullivan, Timothy Joseph 
Walsh, Walter J. ' 



Charlestown 

West Roxbury 

Stoneham 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Roxbury 

Watertown 

Neponset 

Boston 

East Boston 

Dorchester 

East Boston 

Enfield, N. H. 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Weymouth 

South Boston 

Boston 

Watertown 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Rockland 

Cambridge 

Newton Highlands 

South Boston 

Boston 



First Rudiments B* 



Barden, Joseph A. 
Barrett, John V. 
Braun, Frederick J. 
Brennan, James J. 
Brosnahan, Jeremiah V. 
Collins, Cornelius V. 
Coyne, Lawrence J. 
Cullen, Maurice F. 
Cummings, Eugene B. 
Cummings, John J. 
Enwright, Francis X. 
Fulton, David H. 
Gately, Matthias J. 
Gavin, Basil S. 
Gearin, Thomas C. 
Gibbons, Michael S. 
Gillespie, William J. 
Leahy, Albert M. 
Lynch, Daniel L. 



Chelsea 

Roxbury 

Jamaica Plain 

Somerville 

South Boston 

Brockton 

Brighton 

Somerville 

Jamaica Plain 

Newtonville 

Salem 

Somerville 

Roxbury 

South Boston 

South Boston 

Charlestown 

East Boston 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 



23 



MacNeill, Francis A. 
Madden, John C. 
Maguire, Edward L. 
Maney, Louis 
Mulvey, Frederick J. 
Murphy, Michael J. 
Murray, Leo F. 
McCafferty, Charles J. 
McCusker, William P. 
McElaney, Hugh J. 
Nolan, Edward A. 
O'Brien, Edward A. 
O'Connell, J. Augustus 
O'Hern, Daniel J. 
O'Keefe, Thomas F. 
Ryan, Stephen F. 
Scully, George E. 
Shealey, Michael J. 
Sullivan, John J. 
Sullivan, Samuel L. 
Treanor, James J. 
• Thompson, Louis T. 
Wessling, Joseph F. 



East Boston 

Newton 

East Boston 

Woburn 

Mattapan 

Brockton 

Newton 

West Medford 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

South Boston 

East Boston 

Danvers 

Hyde Park 

East Boston 

Marlboro 

Boston 

Brockton 

Charlestown 

East Boston 

East Boston 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 



Second Rudiments, 



Brennan, Frederick S. 
Brownrigg, William A. 
Cassidy, William J. 
Chisholm, Joseph L. 
Conlin, Thomas A. 
Connor, Joseph A. 
Donahue, Arthur J. 
Flood, George P. 
Gifford, Irving L. 
Gillan, Joseph J. 
Higgins, Patrick J. 
Hodgkinson, Eugene A. 
Lenthier, Amand A. 
Mahoney, Bradford B. 
Mullen, James E. 
Murray, Francis A. 
McCarthy, Charles C. 
O'Donnell, William F. 
Reynolds, John T. 
Sexton, Cornelius J. 
Toohey, George A. 
Williams, Henry J. 



Somerville 

Roxbury 

Watertown 

Cambridgeport 

Cambridgeport 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Newton 

Roxbury 

Melrose 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Dorchester 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Allston 

Woburn 

Boston 

Roxbury 

Boston 



24 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897 •> 98. 



Special A. 



Burke, John M. 
Butters, Francis L. 
Carney, Francis L. 
Coyle, George N. 
Donnelly, Joseph R. 
Feeley, Michael W. 
Flanagin, Walter L. 
Fox, John M. 
Haggerty, Francis 
Hennessey, John F. 
Joyce, James H. 
Kenny, Richard H. 
Killilea, William G. 
Koen, William H. 
Lynch, Daniel J. 
Moran, James P. 
McGlinchey, Joseph F. 
McGovern, James L. 
O'Connor, Timothy M. 
O'Kane, Joseph C. 
Renaud, Emile E. 



Cannon, John J. 
Ceconi, John A. 
Clancy, Patrick H. 
Clancy, William H. 
Connolly, Martin J. 
Conway, Walter G. 
Coveney, Francis X. 
Coyne, Leonard S. 
Crowley, William D. 
Devaney, Patrick A. 
Glover, Francis J. 
Hagerty, Peter A. 
Holland, William J. 
Kelly, William P. 
Lyons, Joseph P. 
Mullen, John F. 
Murphy, George A. 
Murphy, William E. 
O'Reilly, Joseph T. 
Phinn, John J. 
Randall, Roy McG. 
Ruth, William A. 
Sullivan, Leo A. 



Special B. 



Amesbury 

Revere 

Salem 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Dorchester 

Dedham 

Dorchester 

Oxford 

Lynn 

Salem 

Roxbury 

Charlestown 

Salem 

Dorchester 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Dorchester 

Boston 



Roxbury 

Dorchester 

South Boston 

Marlboro 

Jamaica Plain 

West Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

Cambridge 

Waltham 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

Chelsea 

Charlestown 

North Easton 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Charlestown 

South Boston 

Roxbury 

Cambridge 

West Lynn 

Cambridge 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



25 



Special 



Bowles, Benjamin F. 
Brady, Francis C. 
Cassidy, Bernard J. 
Croker, Henry C. 
Dever, Martin D. 
Devlin, Joseph H. 
Doherty, Francis J. 
Fitzpatrick, Vincent J. 
Ford, Thomas J. 
Gaffney, James F. 
Kane, Henry J. 
Kernan, John W. 
Kerrigan, Michael J. 
Kiley, Charles J. 
Macdonald, A. E. Archibald 
Martin, Alfred 
Moran, Edmund F. 
Mulvaney, James F. 
McCarthy, Joseph A. 
McGillicuddy, Denis J. 
O'Brien, William E. 
Peard, William A. 
Shields, George C. 
Vaas, Henry J. 
Wellings, William E. 



English* 

Whitman 

West Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Weymouth Centre 

Roxbury 

Roxbury 

Woburn 

Brookline 

Watertown 

Lowell 

Boston 

Wakefield 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Chelsea 

Boston 

Chelsea 

Salem 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Somerville 

Dorchester 

Mansfield 

Boston 

East Boston 



Out of Course* 



Doland, Franklin P. 
McCabe, Denis A. 
O'Reilly, William F. 
Sennott, John R. 



Roxbury 
Chelsea 
Dorchester 
Cambridgeport 



Classes of College Department 
Classes of Preparatory Department 
Special English 
Out of Course 



176 

272 

25 

4 



Attendance by Districts. 



Boston Municipality 




Marlboro 


4 


Boston 


70 


Mattapan 


2 


East Boston 


27 


Melrose 


1 


South Boston 


27 


Milford 


3 


Allston 


2 


Milton 


1 


Brighton 


3 


Natick 


1 


Charlestown 


27 


Neponset 


1 


Dorchester 


30 


Newton 


9 


Jamaica Plain 


18 


Newton Highlands 


1 


Roslindale 


4 


Newton Upper Falls 


2 


Roxbury 


64 


Newtonville 


1 


West Roxbury 




North Easton 


2 


Abington 




North Weymouth 


1 


Amesbury 




Norwood 


2 


Arlington 




Oxford 


1 


Auburndale 




Quincy 


3 


Belmont 


3 


Randolph 


2 


Beverly 


2 


Readville 


1 


Brockton 


5 


Revere 


2 


Brookline 


5 


Rockland 


1 


Cambridge 


19 


Salem 


7 


Cambridgeport 


6 


Saxonville 


1 


Canton 


4 


Somerville 


8 


Chelsea 


16 


South Framingham 


1 


Cochituate 


1 


South Lawrence 


1 


Concord 


2 


Stoneham 


1 


Danvers 


1 


Stoughton 


1 


Dedham 


3 


Wakefield 


4 


East Saugus 


1 


Waltham 


7 


East Weymouth 


2 


Watertown 


9 


Enfield, N. H. 


1 


West Canaan, N. H. 


1 


Everett 


1 


West Lynn 


1 


Holbrook 


1 


West Medford 


1 


Holliston 


3 


West Newton 


1 


Hudson 


2 


West Quincy 


1 


Hyde Park 


9 


Weymouth 


1 


Ipswich 


1 


Weymouth Centre 


2 


Kingston 


1 


Winchester 


1 


Lawrence 


1 


Whitman 


1 


Lowell 


1 


Woburn 


6 


Lynn 


6 


Woonsocket, R. I. 


1 


Maiden 


1 






Mansfield 


1 


Total, 


477 



Calendar for 1898-99. 



First Term. 
1898. 

August 29 to September i, Examination of "Condi- 
tioned " Students and Candidates for 
admission. 
" 29 — Monday, 9 to 10.30 a. m., translation of 

English into Latin; 10.45 a - m - to 12.30 
p. m., translation and analysis of Latin 
authors, Latin Grammar. 
" 30 — Tuesday, 9 to 10.30 a. m., translation of 

English into Greek ; 10.45 a - m - to 12.30 
p. m., translation and analysis of Greek 
authors, Greek Grammar. 
" 31 — Wednesday, 9 to 10.30 a. m., Chemistry, 

German or French ; 10.45 a. m. to 1 p. m. , 
English Studies. 
September 1 — Thursday, 9 to 11 a. m., Mathematics. 

u 6 — Tuesday, Opening of Schools. 8.30 to 10 

a. m., Enrollment of New Students; 10 
a. m.j Reading of Roll, Assignment to 
Classes; 10.45 a - m *> Schola brevis in 
Literature, Classics and Philosophy. 
M 7 — Wednesday, Regular Class and Schola brevis 

in Modern Languages, Mathematics and 
Sciences. 
u 12 — Monday, Solemn Mass of the Holy Ghost, 
Sermon, Veni Creator \ no Mathematics ; 
Inauguration of Sodalities. 
" 14 — Wednesday, Lectures on Christian Doctrine 

begin. 
" 16 — Friday, Elocution Lectures begin; first 
meeting of the Debating Societies. 
October 1 — Saturday, Monthly Announcement of Class 

Standing, etc. 
u 16 — Tuesday, Closing of the Forty Hours' De- 

votion, Solemn High Mass ; no Mathe- 
matics. 
" 31 — Monday, Examination of Seniors in Minor 

Logic. 



28 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 



i 1 



< t 



November 1 — Tuesday, Feast of All Saints, Holiday. 

2 — Wednesday, Feast of All Souls, Solemn 
High Mass at 9 a. m. ; no Mathematics. 
5 — Saturday, Monthly Announcement of Class 
Standing. 

" 8 — Tuesday, State Elections, no classes for 

Seniors. 

" 24 — Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. 
December 3 — Saturday, Monthly Announcement of Class 

Standing. 

u 8 — Thursday, Feast of the Immaculate Con- 

ception, Holiday. 

" 12 — Monday, Examination of Seniors in Major 
Logic. 

" 16 — Friday, Repetitions for Mid-year Examin- 
ations begin. 

" 23 — Friday, Christmas Holidays begin at 12.30 
p. m. 

u 28 — Wednesday, Shakespeare's King John pre- 
sented by Students of College Classes at 
7.45 p. in., in College Hall. 

1899. 

January 2 — Monday, Classes resumed ; Written Exam- 
inations begin; 9 to 11.20 a. m., English 
Composition ; n.30 a. m. to 2 p. m., 
Regular Order. 
11 3 — Tuesday, Eatin Theme ; order as on Mon- 

day. 

4 — Wednesday, Greek Theme; order as on 
Monday ; Examination of Seniors in 
Ontology. 

5 — Thursday, Rhetorical Analysis for Juniors; 
Eatin Verse for Sophomores and Fresh- 
men ; order as on Monday. Regular 
Order for other Classes. 

23 — Monday, Mid-year Examinations. French 
or German Theme, 9 to 10.30 a. m. ; 
10.45 a - m - to 12.30 p. m., Translation 
and Analysis ; Chemistry for Juniors and 
Sophomores ; Physiological Psychology 
for Seniors ; Regular Classes for Rudi- 
ments ; Monthly Announcement of Class 
Standing at 1 p, m. 



< 1 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 29 

January 25 — Wednesday, Latin Authors. 
" 26 — Thursday, Greek Authors. 

u 27 — Friday, Mathematics, 9 to 11.30 a. 111. ; 

Confessions at 11.30 a. 111. 
" 30 — Monday, English ; Examination of Seniors 

in Cosmology. 

Second Term* 

February 1 — Wednesday, Announcement of Term Aver- 
ages at 9 a. 111. ; Schola brevis ; Seniors 
begin Psychology and Ethics. 
u 15 — Ash- Wednesday, 9 a. 111., Mass; no Mathe- 

matics. 
u 22 — Wednesday, Washington's Birthday, Holi- 

day. 
March 4 — Saturday, Monthly Announcement of Class 

Standing ; Subjects for Prize Essays 
announced. 
13 — Monday, Examination of Seniors in Ra- 
tional Psychology. 
17 — Friday, Feast of St. Patrick, Holiday. 
21 — Tuesday, Annual Retreat begins. 
24 — Friday, General Communion, Mass at 9 

a. m. 
29 — Wednesday, Easter Holidays begin at 11.30 
a. m. 
April 5 — Wednesday, Classes resumed ; Monthly 

Announcement of Class Standing at 1 
p. m. 
lt 17 — Monday, Examination of Seniors in Ethics. 

11 19 — Wednesday, Patriots' Day, Holiday. 

" 25 — Tuesday, Prize Debate in College Hall at 

8 p. 111. 
" 28 — Friday, Examinations for Seniors in Physi- 

ological Psychology. 
May 1 — Monday, Theses in Philosophy given ; 

Seniors' repetitions begin. 
3 — Wednesday, Shakespeare's Coniedy of Errors 
presented by Preparatory Schools at 7.45 
p. m. in College Hall. 
6 — Saturday, Monthly Announcement of Class 
Standing. 
10 — Wednesday, Repetitions for all Classes be- 
gin ; English Composition, 9 to 11.20 
a. in. ; 11.30 a. 111., Regular Class. 



u 

t c 
t ( 
I i 

( t 



1 1 



1 1 



u 



( I 



30 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 

May 11 — Ascension Thursday, Holiday. 

" 12 — Friday, Latin Theme; order as on Wed- 

nesday. 
13 — Saturday, Contest for Catechism Prize, 9 
to 12 a. m. 

15 — Monday, Greek Theme; order as on 
Wednesday ; Repetitions for Rudiment 
Classes. 

16 — Tuesday, Rhetorical Analysis for Juniors; 

Latin Verse for Sophomores and Fresh- 
men, 9 to 11.20 a. m. ; Repetitions for 
other Classes. 

" 20 — Saturday, Preliminary Contest in Elocu- 

tion and Reading, 9 a. m. 

u 29 — Monday, Public Contest in Elocution in 

College Hall at 8 p. m. 

u 30 — Tuesday, Memorial Day, Holiday. 

" 31 — Wednesday, Classes of Senior year close. 

June 1 — Thursday, Written Examination in Phys- 

ics, 9 to 12 a. m. 

" 2 — Friday, Examination of Seniors in Natural 

Theology, 9 to 12 a. m. 

u 3 — Saturday, Final Contest in Elocution for 

Preparatory Classes, 10 to 12 a. m. 
5 — Monday, Oral Examinations in Physics, 9 
a. m. 

7 — Wednesday, Oral Examinations in Philos- 
ophy, 9 to 12 a. m. and 3.30 to 5.30 p. m. 

8 — Thursday, Oral Examinations in Philos- 
ophy. 

9 — Friday, Oral Examinations in Philosophy. 
10 — Saturday, 10 a. m., Final Contest in 

Reading. 

13 — Tuesday, General Examination begins. 
Rudiments have class ; Experimental 
Examinations in Analytical Chemistry 
for Juniors, 9 a. m. to 12.30 p. m.; Writ- 
ten Examination for Sophomores, 10.30 
a. m. to 12.30 p. m. ; French Theme, 9 
to 10.30 a. in. ; French Authors, 10.40 
a. m. to 12.25 p. m. ; Monthly Announce- 
ment of Class Standing, 1 to 2 p. m. 

14 — Wednesday, Greek Authors, 9 to 10.30 
a. m., and 10.45 a - m - to 12.25 P- m - 



t ( 



( c 



u 



1 1 



u 



1 1 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 31 

June 15 — Thursday, Latin Authors. 

16 — Friday, English. 
19 — Monday, English. 

20 — Tuesday, Mathematics, 9 to 11.20 a. m. 
21 — Wednesday, Feast of St. Aloysius; General 

Communion; Distribution of Tickets for 

Commencement. 

25 — Sunday, Solemn Vespers at 7.30 p. m., in 
the Church, with Baccalaureate Sermon. 

26 — Monday, Distribution of Prizes for Pre- 
paratory Schools at 8 p. m. in College 
Hall. 

27 — Tuesday, Distribution of Prizes for College 
Classes at 8 p. m. in College Hall. 

28 — Wednesday, Graduation at 8 p. m. in 
College Hall. 



System of Education, 



i. The educational system of Boston College is sub- 
stantially that of all other Colleges of the Society of Jesus. 
Since the publication of the Monumenta Pedagogica Ger- 
manics by the German government, and the Great Educators' 
Series, by Scribner's Sons, those who are desirous of making 
either a scientific or historical study of that system have 
abundant sources of information. To these publications 
are referred readers interested in studying the detailed 
working of the system and the practical method of apply- 
ing its principles as elaborated in the Ratio Studionim. 

The subjoined brief outline of the underlying principles 
of the system, the dominant features of its method, and 
the object aimed at by its teaching will give a general idea 
of its purpose. 

2. Education is understood by the Fathers of the Society 
in its completest sense, as the full and harmonious devel- 
opment of all those faculties that are distinctive of man. 
It is not, therefore, mere instruction or the communica- 
tion of knowledge. In fact, the acquisition of knowledge, 
though it necessarily accompanies any right system of 
education, is a secondary result of education. Learning 
is an instrument of education, not its end. The end is 
culture, and mental and moral development. 

3. Understanding, then, clearly the purposes of educa- 
tion, such instruments of education, that is, such studies, 
sciences or languages are chosen as will most effectively 
further that end. These studies are chosen, moreover, 
only in proportion as, and in such numbers as, are suffi- 
cient and required. A student who is to be educated will 
not be forced, in the short period of his college course, 
and with his immature faculties, to study a multiplicity 
of the lauguages and sciences into which the vast world of 
modern knowledge has been scientifically divided. If two 
or more sciences, for instance, give similar training to 
some mental faculty, that one is chosen which combines 
the most effective training with the largest and most fun- 
damental knowledge. 

4. The purpose of the mental training given is not prox- 
imately to fit the student for some special employment or 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1 897-' 98. 33 

profession, but to give him such a general, vigorous and 
rounded development as will enable him to cope success- 
fully even with the unforeseen emergencies of life. While 
giving the mind stay, it tends to remove the insularity of 
thought and want of mental elasticity, which is one of the 
most hopeless and disheartening results of specialism on 
students who have not brought to their studies the uniform 
mental training given by a systematic College Course. 
The studies, therefore, are so graded and classified as to be 
adapted to the mental growth of the student and the scien- 
tific unfolding of knowledge ; they are so chosen and com- 
municated that the student shall gradually and harmoni- 
ously reach, as nearly as may be, that measure of culture 
of which he is capable. 

5. It is fundamental in the system of the Society of Jesus 
that different studies have distinct and peculiar educa- 
tional values. Mathematics, the Natural Sciences, lan- 
guage and History are complementary instruments of 
education to which the doctrine of equivalence cannot be 
applied. The specific training given by one cannot be 
supplied by another. 

6. Furthermore, Language and History have always 
been held in esteem as leading factors in education. Mathe- 
matics and the Natural Sciences bring the student into 
contact with the material aspects of nature, and exercise 
the inductive and deductive powers of reason. Language 
and History effect a higher union; they are manifestations 
of spirit to spirit, and by their study and for their acquire- 
ment the whole mind of man is brought into widest and 
subtlest play. The acquisition of Language especially 
calls for delicacy of judgment, and fineness of perception, 
and for a constant, keen, and quick use of the reasoning 
powers. A special importance is attached to the classic 
tongues of Rome and Greece. As they are languages with 
a structure and idiom remote from the language of the 
student, the study of them lays bare before him the laws 
of thought and logic, and requires attention, reflection and 
an analysis of the fundamental relations between thought 
and grammar. In studying them the student is led to the 
fundamental recesses of language. They exercise him in 
exactness of conception in grasping the foreign thought, 
and in delicacy of expression in clothing that thought in 
the dissimilar garb of the mother tongue. While, recog- 
nizing, then, in education the necessity and importance of 



34 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897 -' 98. 

Mathematics and the Natural Sciences, which unfold the 
inter-dependence and laws of the world of time and space, 
the Jesuit system of education has unwaveringly kept 
Language in a position of honor as an instrument of 
culture. 

7. Lastly, the system does not share the illusion of those 
who seem to imagine that education, understood as an en- 
riching and stimulating of the intellectual faculties, has a 
morally elevating influence in human life. While conced- 
ing the effects of education in energizing and refining 
imagination, taste, understanding and powers of observa- 
tion, it has always held that knowledge and intellectual 
development of themselves have no moral efficacy. Re- 
ligion only can purify the heart, and guide and strengthen 
the will. 

8. The Jesuit system of education, then, aims at develop- 
ing, side by side, the moral and intellectual faculties of the 
student, and sending forth to the world men of sound judg- 
ment, of acute and rounded intellect, of upright and manly 
conscience. And since men are not made better citizens 
by the mere accumulation of knowledge, without a guid- 
ing and controlling force, the principal faculties to be 
developed are the moral faculties. Moreover, morality is 
to be taught continuously ; it must be the underlying 
base, the vital force supporting and animating the whole 
organic structure of education. It must be the atmosphere 
the student breathes ; it must suffuse with its light all 
that he reads, illumining what is noble and exposing what 
is base, giving to the true and false their relative light 
and shade. 

In a word, the purpose of Jesuit teaching is to lay a 
solid substructure in the whole mind and character for 
any superstructure of science, professional and special, also 
for the building up of moral life, civil and religious. 



Studies. 



9. It is one of the decided advantages of the system fol- 
lowed in this College, that the student may begin his 
preparatory studies and then pass on, through the college 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 35 

course to graduation, in the same institution. This se- 
cures, besides the moral influence thus gained, a uniform 
and homogeneous course of teaching and of training. The 
result of such a course of study is a continuous and 
normal development of the mental faculties along well de- 
fined lines, and the possession of a clear and coherent sys- 
tem of principles upon which any special courses may af- 
terwards safely rest. 

10. The complete course of studies is graduated as 
follows : 

At the beginning of the Preparatory Course attention is 
given chiefly to the acquiring of an accurate knowledge of 
English and of elementary Mathematics, together with 
such general school work as is commonly assigned to young- 
boys at this stage of their education. This part of the 
course includes, also, the first elements of L,atin ; thus at 
the very start, it is possible to begin a comparative study 
of grammar. The continued use of oral and written 
exercises makes the teaching accurate and eminently 
practical. 

11. In the second term of the first year the study of 
Greek is begun ; and in the second year French or German 
is taken up. 

12. Though it is not deemed advisable to give up, in any 
part of the course, the training of the memory, yet this 
exercise yields gradually, as the student proceeds, to the 
more important exercise of the judgment, to the develop- 
ment of literary taste and to the exercise of the critical 
powers. 

13. At his entrance into the College Course, after the 
three or four years of preparatory training, the student is 
expected to be reasonably familiar with Eatin, Greek, 
French or German, to have a practical knowledge of 
the grammars and idioms of these languages, and to have 
acquired a knowledge and command of the elementary 
principles of English composition. He is then prepared 
to enter upon his literary work and to study intelligently 
and profitably the best models of ancient and modern liter- 
ature. He has, moreover, laid the foundations of higher 
studies in Mathematics by a thorough training in Arith- 
metic, Elementary Algebra and Geometry. 

14. The principal work of the second year of the Colle- 
giate Course is the training of the imagination and the cul- 
tivation of literary taste and style. The nature of poetry 



36 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 

is explained, the art of verse-making is constantly prac- 
tised, and the writings of the great poets and masters of 
English prose are studied and analyzed. 

15. The development of the critical powers and the ac- 
quirement of method are the main purposes of the follow- 
ing year, which is devoted chiefly to the study of Rhetoric. 
The study of the great poets and prose writers is contin- 
ued, but now more scientifically; the principles of oratory 
are explained, and the great discourses of sacred and pro- 
fane orators are examined. Analysis, discussion and imi- 
tation constitute the practical work of the class. 

16. The last year of the course develops the reasoning 
powers by the severe discipline of Logic, Metaphysics and 
Ethics, with which studies the Higher Mathematics and Nat- 
ural Sciences go hand in hand. The study of Metaphysics 
and Ethics is the principal occupation of this year, since it 
is deemed most important as a means of bringing into right 
order and system all the student's knowledge, and, more- 
over, it furnishes him with the fundamental principles of 
all true science. 

17. All the years of the College Course have their care- 
fully graded classes of Mathematics ; and the study of the 
Natural Sciences is begun as soon as the student's training 
and knowledge of Mathematics have prepared him to 
follow the course with advantage to himself in a logical, 
scientific manner. 



Courses. 



The College offers two Courses of instruction : the Clas- 
sical and English. 

I. Classical. 

18. In the Classical Course the Ratio Studionim is ob- 
served and the studies given in the subjoined schedules are 
pursued. The full course requires seven or eight years ; 
three or four of which are spent in the Preparatory classes, 
and the remainder in the regular College classes. One 
hour a day is devoted to Mathematics, two hours a week 
are given to the study of Modern Languages, two hours a 
week during the Sophomore year are assigned to the 
study of General Chemistry, and two hours a week given 
to Analytical Chemistry during the Junior year. Two 
hours a week, moreover, of laboratory work are exacted 
from students of Chemistry and Physics. The last year 
of the course is almost exclusively devoted to Logic, 
Metaphysics, Ethics and the Natural Sciences. 

II. English. 

19. To the Classical Course was added, September, 1879, 
at the special instance of the Most Reverend Archbishop, 
a Course in which the studies of the xAncient Languages 
is superseded by application to English. The classes in 
Modern Languages, the Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
are the same as in the Classical Course. Philosophy, how- 
ever, is studied in English. This Course offers the advan- 
tages of a thorough English education to that class of our 
youth, who, not intending to follow a profession, stand in 
no special need of classical training; but for whom it is of 
importance that they be well grounded in their faith and 
spend some years at least under healthy, religious training. 
At present the Course consists of four years, during which 
the student is engaged in the studies of an English High 
School. On completion of the Course a diploma of grad- 
uation is given, but no degrees are conferred. 

20. Special Classes have been added to the Course of 
studies in the Preparatory School for the benefit of young 
men wishing to prepare to enter College or Professional 



38 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 

Schools. Students whose age, mental development, previ- 
ous attainments and habits of study are not such as to give 
reasonable expectation of profit from the Courses will be 
discouraged from entering. The Faculty reserves the right 
of removing students from these classes if they are found 
unfit or unworthy. The Courses are arranged so that young 
men having the needed prior preparation (a) may fit them- 
selves to enter Medical, Law or Scientific Schools ; (b) may, 
if they are sufficiently advanced in their English studies 
and in Mathematics, prepare for entrance into the Freshman 
class of the College in a shorter time than is required for 
those who enter the Preparatory School. 

The Courses in preparation for Professional Schools will 
not be open, unless at least twelve students for a Course are 
enrolled. 



Religious Training. 

21. The moral and religious part of education is consid- 
ered to be incomparably the most important. Catholic 
students, if not excused for good reasons, are required to 
recite the daily catechetical lesson, to attend the weekly 
lecture on the doctrines of the Church, to make the annual 
retreat, to present themselves to their confessor every 
month, and, if they have not received the Sacraments of 
Penance, Confirmation, or Holy Eucharist, to prepare for 
their reception. 

Literary and Athletic Facilities. 

22. There are various Societies in which, under the 
moderatorship of College officers, the work of the class- 
room is supplemented, or special fields in the liberal arts 
are cultivated. 

A choice collection of books, numbering about four 
thousand, affords the student ample means, both for the 
preparation of lessons and themes, and for reading in 
connection with his studies. 

For his physical development, provision has been made 
in the well-equipped gymnasium. Here he can enjoy the 
advantages, not only of a complete apparatus, track, baths, 
etc., but also of a competent and responsible instructor, 
who will direct and control his exercises. A small fee 
covering expenses will be charged. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 39 



Class Standing* 

23. For each memory lesson, according to its excellence, 
the scholar receives a mark, grading from ten down ; for 
translation, from twenty ; and for themes or composition, 
from thirty ; as the labor of preparation of these various 
exercises, and their relative importance, are considered to 
be to each other as one, two and three. 

24. A report of each student's class standing is sent to 
parents or guardians on the Monday after the first Saturday 
of each month, and at the end of each term. This report 
— except the one that is sent at the end of the year — is, 
after inspection, to be signed by parents or guardians and 
returned to the Prefect of Studies. 

25. On the scale used 100 is the highest mark and o 
the lowest. The student's rank is determined by his posi- 
tion in one of five grades : A, excellent, 100-91 ; B, very 
good, 90-81 ; C, good, 80-71 ; D, fair, 70-61 ; E, poor, be- 
low 60. 

At the end of each month public proclamation is made 
of the average of all marks in the separate departments of 
Classics, Mathematics and Modern Languages. The aver- 
age of these monthly averages is what is termed the average 
of monthly results ; at the middle examination, averages 
are given in like manner for the various branches, and a 
common examination average is struck. To obtain the 
term average that of the monthly results and of the exam- 
inations are combined in a ratio of two to one. 

26. In the second term or session the same method is 
followed, and the year's results are seen in the average 
obtained from the combination of those of the two terms. 
According to this average of results for the year class 
honors and promotions are determined. The medal and 
premium are conferred on the first two students who have 
reached the highest annual average above 93 ; " honorable 
mention " on those above 85. An average of 60 is required 
for promotion. To prevent exclusive devotion to one pur- 
suit it has been found necessary for culpable failure in 
Mathematics, Modern Languages, or Natural Sciences to 
refuse promotion in the main class. Hence, students 
whose general average is above 60, but who have fallen 
below 60 in some studies, will be " conditioned " in those 
studies, and will not be promoted until the condition is 
removed by a satisfactory examination. 

2 38 18 



40 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 

27. Parents and guardians should observe that absence 
and tardiness, even when excusable, affect class standing. 

No student will be promoted from any class till his 
progress justifies advancement. 



Degrees, 

28. At the end of the year devoted to Philosophy, the 
seventh or eighth in the Classical Course, the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts will be conferred on those students who 
shall have attained the required yearly averages and passed 
satisfactory final examinations. 

29. For the further degree of Master of Arts it will be 
required that the applicant shall have continued his studies 
in College one year, or. studied or practised a learned pro- 
fession for two years. In the latter case the candidate for 
the degree is required to compose on some literary, scien- 
tific or ethical subject, an essay which, in the judgment of 
the Faculty, shall show study justifying the conferring of 
the degree. 

Admission, 

30. Boston College is for day scholars. 

No student will be admitted who does not reside with 
his parents or immediate relatives, or, if this is impossible, 
with persons duly approved by the President of the Col- 
lege. Those who. come from other institutions must show 
certificates of honorable dismission. 

31. For admission into the First Division of Rudiments 
in the Preparatory School a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of English Grammar and Arithmetic, of the out- 
lines of Geography, and of United States History, is re- 
quired. Catholic applicants will be required to know 
the authorized Catechism of the Council of Baltimore. 
Those who have finished the course of a parish or grammar 
school in good standing will be admitted on presenting 
their certificates of graduation. The Second Division of 
Rudiments has been established for those who are within 
a year of graduating from a parish or grammar school, or 
for those who, though graduated from such schools, are 
not sufficiently advanced to enter the First Division. 

32. Applicants for admission to the Freshman class of 
the College must pass a satisfactory examination in the 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 41 

studies of the Preparatory School. A scheme of the sub- 
ject matter will be found on page 48. Applicants from 
certain schools preparing - students to enter college will be 
admitted on presenting their certificate of graduation. 

33. Candidates for admission to higher classes must 
pass the entrance examination and an examination on 
subjects previously studied by the class they propose to 
enter. 

34. On account of age or peculiar circumstances ex- 
emption from certain studies is sometimes conceded, in 
which case the scholar is placed " out of course," and is 
not reckoned a candidate for honors or graduation. 



Terms. 



35. The charge for tuition is thirty dollars per session 
of five months. The bill for the first term will be pre- 
sented on or before October 1st, and is to be paid before 
November 1st ; the bill for the second term will be pre- 
sented on or before March 1st, and is to be paid before 
April 1st. 

Students of Natural Science are charged an extra fee 
of five dollars per session, payable before entrance to the 
class. 

General Regulations. 

36. The students will be admitted to the gymnasium 
at 8.30 ; to the class-rooms at 8.50. 

All students of the College classes must be in their re- 
spective class-rooms at 9 o'clock ; those who come later 
must apply for an admission ticket to the Prefect of 
Discipline. 

Students of the class of Philosophy are to be in their 
class-room at 9.15. 

No student of the Preparatory School will be allowed 
to leave the College premises at the noon recess without 
permission of the Prefect of Discipline. 

Exemption from any of the classes or other exercises of 
the College must be obtained by parents or guardians. 
In no case will the matter be treated of with the students 
themselves. In case of absence or tardiness a note of 
excuse from parents or guardians will be exacted. 

Any conduct unbecoming the character of a. gentleman 
will be regarded as a violation of the College rules. 



42 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897J98. 

Religious motives being habitually appealed to, little 
need has been experienced of frequent or severe punish- 
ment. 

Flagrant offences, such as are detrimental to the reputa- 
tion of the College, or are obstructive of the good of other 
pupils, are grounds for suspension or for conditional or 
absolute expulsion. 

For faults of ordinary occurrence, such as tardy arrival, 
failure in recitations, or minor instances of misconduct, 
detention after school, or the task of copying or commit- 
ting to memory some lines of an author, is usually found 
to be a sufficient penalty. 



Parental Co-operation. 

37. The efforts of teachers and prefects will be much 
facilitated if the co-operation of parents can be secured. 

Parents are, therefore, earnestly requested : 

1st. — To insist upon daily study at home for two or 
three hours at least. 

2d. — To notify the Prefect speedily in case of the 
withdrawal of their sons, or of necessary detention from, 
or tardy arrival at, school ; of failure to receive the 
monthly report. 

3d. — To attend to notifications — always sent by the 
Prefect on the second day of an unexplained absence, or for 
lessons signally bad during a considerable length of time. 

4th. — To require and examine the monthly report, 
and not to pass over without inquiring into averages falling 
below seventy. 

Daily Order. 

38. The usual hours for school are from 9 A. M. to 2 
p. m., with short recesses at convenient intervals. Students 
of Natural Sciences are expected to make forty-five hours 
laboratory work each term outside of the usual school 
hours. 

Special arrangements will be necessary in each indi- 
vidual case to excuse late arrival. In every case the 
reasons for exemption are to be presented by parents or 
guardians. 

During the progress of the examinations the time for 
closing will be somewhat anticipated. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-* 98. 43 

Sessions and Holidays. 

39. The first session begins on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday of September ; the second on the first Tuesday 
of February ; but students are not precluded from entering 
at other times. Schools will close by Graduation Exer- 
cises on the first Wednesday after the twenty-second of 
June. 

The following are the ordinary holidays : — 

Every Saturday except the first Saturday of the month. 

The days of a session remaining after the close of an 
examination. 

All the holydays of obligation. 

From the 23d of December to the 2d of January. 

From Wednesday in Holv Week to Wednesday in Easter 
Week. 

The Feasts of St. Patrick and St. Aloysius. 

Thanksgiving Day, Washington's Birthday, April 19, 
Decoration Day, June 17. 

Attendance will be required in the forenoon of the first 
Saturday of the month, not for class recitations, but for 
certain religious and literary exercises. 



Scholarships. 



The regularly founded Scholarships are : — 

Twenty Scholarships at the disposal of St. Mary's 
Church at the North End. These Scholarships were 
given by the College in .1864, in recognition of generous 
contributions made by the parishioners of St. Mary's to the 
building of the College Church of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion. The pastor of St. Mary's selects the candidates from 
among the pupils of the parish school, in which the Schol- 
arships are won by competition. 

Two Scholarships, founded by Rev. William Orr, of 
Cambridge. The Reverend founder has the privilege of 
selecting the candidates for these Scholarships in conjunc- 
tion with the President of the College. 

The Rose Fitzpatrick Scholarship, founded in 1894, 
by a bequest of the lady whose name it bears. 

The Father Charlier Scholarship, founded in 1894, 
by the Immaculate Conception Conference of St. Vincent 
de Paul Society, to commemorate the semi-centenary in 
Religion of their Spiritual Director. 

The Henry Doherty Scholarship, founded in 1895, 
by the late Henry Doherty. The selection of the benefici- 
ary, according to the terms of the gift, is to be made by 
the executors of the founder, subject to the approval of the 
College authorities. 

The FlatlEy Scholarship, founded in 1896, by the 
late Rev. Michael F. Flatley, of Maiden, in favor of some 
deserving student of the parochial school of the Church of 
the Immaculate Conception, Maiden. 

The Dolan Scholarships, founded, one in 1896, the 
other in 1898, by Rev. Michael Dolan, of Newton. The 
beneficiary is to be a graduate of the Grammar or High 
School of the Parish of Our L,ady at Newton. In case no 
such student applies, another may be sent by the pastor 
of said church or the Archbishop of Boston, provided he 
is fit to begin the course at the College or Preparatory 
School. 

The John F. Cronan Scholarship, founded August, 
1897, by John F. Cronan, of Boston. This foundation is 
in favor of any deserving young man who is without means 
of securing an education. This Scholarship shall be open 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. ■ 45 

to competition. All examinations for the same shall be 
held after due notice is given in at least two newspapers. 
The holder of this Scholarship is entitled to all the privi- 
leges of the four years' course in Boston College. In the 
event of no one applying to compete for the Scholarship 
there is reserved the right of selection by His Grace, the 
Archbishop of Boston. 

The Hannah McCarthy Scholarship, founded in 
1898 by a bequest of the lady whose name it bears. 

Besides these Scholarships the generous efforts of friends 
of the College have enabled the faculty to establish twenty- 
three more, which may be called the Boston College Schol- 
arships. These will be offered for competition whenever 
they are vacant.* Due notice of the dates and conditions 
of competition will be given in the yearly catalogue of the 
College, f 

The sum of $1,500 will furnish a Scholarship which will 
ensure the tuition of a student, but it will require the inter- 
est of $2,000 to enable the student, besides, to purchase his 
text-books and to meet other contingent expenses of the 
course. 



Competitors for Scholarships in the Preparatory School 

of Boston College* 

1. The candidate must be under fifteen years of age. 

2. The candidate will be examined in the following 
studies : — 

English. — (a) An English Composition on a narrative 
subject. Spelling, Elementary Punctuation, Grammar and 
Penmanship will be examined, (d) The candidates will be 
required to give an account of the following books : Rob- 
inson Crusoe ; Two Years before the Mast, Dana ; Alice 
in Wonderland ; Percy Wynne, Finn, (c) The correction 
of sentences defective in Spelling or Grammar. 

Arithmetic. — The matter covered in Wentworth' s 
Practical Arithmetic to chapter XIII., or an equivalent 
book. 

History of the United States. 

Geography. — The most salient facts of the Geography 
of Europe and North and South America, especially the 
Geography of the United States. 

* For conditions of competitions, see pp. 45 1 and 46. 
t The President of Boston College offers this year two vacant Scholar- 
ships in the Preparatory School and one in the College for competition. 



46 BOSTON COLLEGE, i8 9 y-' 9 8 

Catechism. — Catholic candidates will be examined in 
the Authorized Catechism of the Council of Baltimore. 

The successful competitors will be admitted to the class 
of First Rudiments, and on the successful completion of 
the course in the Preparatory Schools to the College. 



Competitors for Scholarships in Boston College. 

Will be examined in the following studies : — 

English. — An English Composition on a subject to be 
assigned on the day of the competition ; examination show- 
ing mastery of Grammar, and some proficiency in descrip- 
tive and narrative writing. 

Latin. — The Latin Grammar, including a knowledge 
of all regular syntactical constructions. 

Translations into Latin of English sentences, entailing 
the application of the rules of Grammar, especially those 
relating to the oratia obliqua, and conditional sentences. 

Parsing and translations into English of selections from 
Nepos' Lives, to the end of the life of Alcibiades ; Caesar's 
Commentaries, first book ; Ovid's Metamorphoses, one 
thousand lines ; Cicero's selected letters, five hundred 
lines. 

Greek. — The Greek Grammar, etymology complete, 
including irregular and defective forms, the outlines of 
Syntax. 

Translations into Greek of simple English sentences 
entailing a knowledge of Grammar required. 

Parsing and translation of the Witticisms of Hierocles 
and iEsop's Fables (at the end of Yenni's Grammar). 
Xenophon's Anabasis, books first and second. 

In the grammatical analysis of Greek and Latin authors the candidate 
must be prepared to show a thorough and practical acquaintance with the 
amount of Grammar required. A satisfactory equivalent in Attic prose will 
be admitted instead of the Witticisms and Fables of Yenni's Grammar. 

Modern Languages. — The elements of French or 
German Grammar, and some proficiency in translating 
and parsing. 

History. — A general outline of Ancient and Modern 
History. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic, Algebra, to the end of 
Quadratics, Geometry, plane and solid, Wentworth's 
Complete Algebra and Wentworth's Geometry, or works 
of equal grade. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 47 

The successful competitors will be admitted to the class 
of higher grammar (freshman). Satisfactory testimonials 
of character will be required of those who come from other 
institutions. Failure during one term to obtain the per- 
centage required for promotion (sixty per cent.), or any 
grave offence against morals or discipline, will result in 
the forfeiture of scholarship. 

The dates for Examinations will be found on page 27. 



The Course of Studies in the Classes 
of the Preparatory School. 

1898-1899. 

{See page 40 for entrance requirements). 



Second Rudiments* 



English — Memory studies : i-. The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner, Key ; 2. The Lost Chord, Adelaide Proctor; 
3. The Seven Ages of Man, Shakespeare ; 4. The 
Poet Crashaw, Cowley; 5. The Dangers of Delay, 
Southwell ; 6. Toys, Patmore ; 7. The Virgin Mary, 
Wordszvorth ; 8. The Dying Christian, Pope. — C011- 
nolly^s English Reader. 
An English Composition will be assigned once a week 
on a subject giving practice in easy, simple narra- 
tive ; penmanship, spelling, grammar and punctua- 
tion. Daily drill in correcting faulty sentences. 
For reading and study : The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, 
Irving; Tales from Shakespeare, Lamb; Lays of 
Ancient Rome, Macaulay ; Christmas Carol, Dickens ; 
The Story of the Iliad, Church ; Songs of Labor, 
Whittier. 
Bible History, Physical Geography. Elocution practice 
once a week, oral instructions. 

Latin — BenneWs Latin Grammar; regular forms to 
amo inclusive. Written exercises once a week. 

Christian Doctrine — Catechism of the Council of Bal- 
timore. Lectures on Christian Doctrine once a week. 

Mathematics — Wentworth\s Practical Arithmetic. 



First Rudiments* 

{Injirma Gramma tica ) pars inferior). 

English — Memory studies: 1. Warren's Address at 
Bunker Hill, Pierrepont ; 2. A Psalm of Life, Long- 
fellow ; 3. The Rosary of my Tears, Ryan ; 4. Marco 
Bozzaris, Halleck ; 5. Ingratitude, Shakespeare ; 6. 
Silence, Hood. — Connolly^ s English Reader. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 49 

An English Composition will be assigned once a week on 
a subject giving exercise in simple narrative and easy 
description. The following selections from Con- 
nolly^ s Reader will be analyzed: 1. The Egyptian 
Sphinx, Stanley ; 2. Venice at Complete Ebb of 
Tide, Raskin ; 3. Caught in the Whirlpool, Wiseman ; 
4. The Planting of Maryland, Bancroft; 5. The Re- 
turn of Columbus, Prescott ; 6. The Apostle of the 
Indies, Stephen. Elements of English Composition, 
Waddy. 
For reading and study : The Lay of the Last Minstrel, 
Scott; The Story of the^Eneid, Church ; Peter the Great, 
Motley ; The Rape of the Lock, Pope ; Rab and his 
Friends, Brown. 
Ancient History, Fredet, Parts I-V. Elocution prac- 
tice once a week, oral instructions. 

Latin — BenneW s Latin Grammar ; Inflections of Nouns, 
Adjectives, Pronouns and Verbs, and elementary Syn- 
tax. Epistolse Selectae Ciceronis ; Viri Romse, 
D^ Ooge ; Phcedrns. Written exercises three times a 
week. 

Greek — First term. Alphabet practice in reading and 
writing letters and words and writing from dictation. 
Second term. Yenn-Ps Greek Grammar to Verbs in- 
cluding the verb ct/xt and the indicative mood of \vo> 
Elementary rules of accent. Reading lessons in Yen- 
ni's Greek Grammar, to regular Verbs. Written 
exercises once a week. 

Christian Doctrine — De Hardens Catechism, Part III. 
Lectures on Christian Doctrine once a week. 

Mathematics — First term — Wentwortli* s Practical 
Arithmetic reviewed. Second term — Wentworth^s 
Complete Algebra, to chap. VI. 



Second Academic* 

(Injirma Grammatica, pars Superior.} 

English — Memory studies : 1 . To a Waterfowl, Bryant ; 
2. On His Loss of Sight, Milton; 3. Destiny of 
America, Berkeley; 4. Lead Kindly Light, New- 
man ; 5. Alexander's Feast, Dryden ; 6. From u The 
Giaour," Byron. Connolly^ s English Reader. 

An English Composition will be assigned once a week on 



50 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 

subjects giving exercise in simple narrative and de- 
scriptive writing. Versification. The following 
selections from Connolly 1 s Reader will be analyzed : 
1. Judge Pyncheon's Death, Hawthorne; 2. A Child's 
Grief, De Quincey ; 3. The Break in the Embank- 
ment, Reade ; 4. Edward the Confessor, Lingard ; 
5. The Scholars of the Rue de Bac, Farrell ; 6. The 
Amphitheatre of Titus, Gibbon. 
For reading and study : 1 . The Coming and Passing of 
Arthur, Tennyson ; 2. The Revolt of the Tartars, De 
Quincey; 3. Essays of Elia, Lamb ; 4. Thanotopsis, 
Bryant ; 5. Addison, Macau lay ; 6. The Pleasures of 
Hope, Campbell. 
Ancient History, Fredet, Parts VI and VII. Elocution 
once a week, oral instruction. 

L,ATin — Bennett 1 s Eatin Grammar. First term — Repeti- 
tion : Inflections to Irregular Verbs ; Advance : Earge 
print of Syntax, to Tenses of Verbs. Second term — 
Repetition : Regular, Irregular, Impersonal and 
Defective Verbs ; Advance : Syntax, large and fine 
print, to Tenses of Verbs. 
Authors : Epistolse Selectse Ciceronis ; Nepos, Lindsay ; 

Ovid, Lincoln. 
Written exercises twice a week. Rockliff s Exercises, 
Part I, Sections V, VI and VII, and Part II, Sections 
XVII and XVIII. 

Greek — Yenn-Ps Greek Grammar. First term — Repeti- 
tion : first four chapters of Etymology, Nouns, Ad- 
jectives and Pronouns ; Advance : Verbs to formation 
of Second Tenses. Second term — Repetition: Verbs 
to formation of Second Tenses ; Advance : Second 
Tenses, Contract Verbs ; Appendix I ; Accents. 
Authors : Reading Exercises of Yenni 1 s Grammar, in- 
cluding Regular Verbs, Witticisms of Hierocles and 
Fables of ^Esop ; Xenophon's Anabasis, Harper and 
Wallace. Themes once a week. 

Christian Doctrine — De Harbe 1 s Catechism, Part III. 
Lectures on Christian Doctrine once a week. 

Mathematics — Wentworth 1 s Complete Algebra to the 
end of Quadratic Equations. 

French* — Otto 1 s French Grammar. Grandgent 1 s Mate- 
rials for French Composition, Parts V and IV. Ea 
Pipe de Jean Bart ; La Derniere Classe, Daudet ; Se- 
lections from Super 1 s Reader. Themes once a week. 

*The student may choose French or German as a modern language 
study. The course chosen must be completed. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 51 

German* — Cook^s Otto^s German Grammar. Hatfield? s 
material for German Composition; Storm? s Immensee ; 
Hillerrt s Holier als die Kirche ; Andersen* 1 s Maerchen ; 
Arnolds Fritz auf Ferien. Themes once a week. 



First Academic. 

[Media Grammatical) 

English — Memory studies: 1. Flodden Field, Scott; 
2. The Deserted Village, Goldsmith; 3. Gray^ s Elegy ; 
4. The Tiger, Blake; 5. Night and Death, White ; 
6. The Lotus Eaters, Tennyson ; 7. Be Steadfast, 
Clongh. — Connolly^ s English Reader. 

An English Composition once a week on subjects entail- 
ing complex narrative and description, versification. 
Waddy's Composition and Rhetoric. The following 
selections from Connolly^ s English Reader will be 
analyzed: 1. The Trial of Warren Hastings, Mac- 
au lay ; 2. On Classical Education, Hazlitt ; 3. Char- 
acteristics of Great Authors, Newman ; 4. The Art of 
Writing, Johnson ; 5. Story Telling, Swift; 6. The 
Impertinence of the Persecuted, Sidney Smith. 

For reading and study : The Ancient Mariner, Coleridge ; 
Joan of Arc, De Quincey ; Bunker Hill Monument, 
Webster; Childe Harold, Byron; Scenes from Adam 
Bede, George Eliot ; Modern Painters (selections) 
Ruskin. 

Modern History, Fredet, (selected periods). Elocution 
once a week, oral instruction. 
Latin — BennetVs Eatin Grammar: First term — Repeti- 
tion : Verbs and Syntax to Tenses of Verbs ; Advance : 
Syntax of Tenses and Moods of Verbs to Noun and 
Adjective forms of Verb. Second term — Repetition : 
Inflections ; Advance : Syntax completed ; Prosody. 

Authors : Epistolae Selectae Ciceronis; Caesar's Commen- 
taries, Harper and Tolmaii; Virgil, selected Eclogues 
and books of ^Eneid. Sight reading; Nepos' Eives. 

Themes twice a week. Elementary principles of the 
construction of Eatin sentences inculcated. Versifica- 
tion ; Ovid, Easy selections, Wilkinson. 
Greek — Yenni* s Greek Grammar. First term — Repeti- 
tion : The Grammar of last year ; Advance : From 

* The students may choose French or German as a modern language 
study. The course chosen must be completed. 



52 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 

Verbs in /^t to end of Etymology ; Syntax of the Four 
Concords. Second term — Repetition : Last term's 
advance matter ; Advance : Syntax of the Article, of 
Nouns, Adjectives and Pronouns, and Negative Par- 
ticles. 
Authors : Lucian's Dialogues, Xenophon's Cyropsedia. 
Sight Reading, The Anabasis. Themes once a week. 

Christian Doctrine — De Harbe^s Catechism, Part III. 
Lectures on Christian Doctrine once a week. 

Mathematics — WentwortJi* s New Plane and Solid 
Geometry. 

French — Otto^s Grammar. GrandgenP s materials for 
French Composition, Parts III and II ; KimbalP s 
Materials (Columba) ; Peppino, Ventura ; L,e Siege 
de Berlin, Dandet ; Columba, Merrimee ; Moliere^s 
Ee Bourgeois Gentilhomme. Themes once a week. 

German — Cook^s Otto^s German Grammar. Zscohokke^s 
Der Zerbrochene Krug; Schiller'' s Ballads; Meisner* s 
German Conversation. Themes once a week, espe- 
cially exercises in German letter writing. Deutsche 
Eiteraturgeschichte, Wenkebach, Vol. I. 



Studies in the English Course. 

First Year — English Grammar and Composition; Mtir- 
ray^s Advanced Lessons ; Memory studies and Analysis 
of Classical English Selections {see First Rudiments)] 
Written, exercises weekly in simple narration and 
description; Arithmetic reviewed, Wentworth ; Book- 
keeping ; Typewriting ; Catechism, De Harbe ; An- 
cient History, Fredet ; Commercial and Physical 
Geography ; Elocution ; French or German ; (see 
Second A cademic) . 

Second Year — English Rhetoric and Composition, 
Waddy ; Memory studies and Analysis of Classical 
English Selections (see Second Academic) ; Written 
exercises weekly in narration and description ; Civil 
Government, Macy ; Algebra to the end of Quadratics, 
Wentworth ; Book-keeping and Typewriting ; Cate- 
chism, De Harbe ; Ancient History, Fredet ; Com- 
mercial and Physical Geography ; Elocution ; French 
or German ; (see First Academic). 

Third Year — English Rhetoric and Composition, 
Waddy ; History of English Literature ; Written 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 53 

exercises in verse and prose ; Civil Government, 
Seelye ; Geometry, Plane and Solid, Wentworth; 
Christian Doctrine, Wilmers ; History, periods in 
Modern History ; General Chemistry ; [see Sophomore 
year); Elocution; French or German; {see Freshman 
year). 

Fourth Year — English Rhetoric, Genung; History of 
English Eiterature ; Written exercises in augmenta- 
tion and persuasion; Higher Algebra, Wentworth; 
Christian Doctrine, Wilmers ; Constitutional History 
of the United States ; Elocution ; Analytical Chemis- 
try ; {see Junior year) ; French or German. 

Fifth Year — English Rhetoric, Genung ; Written 
exercises in various styles of Oratory ; Mechanics and 
Physics; {see Senior year) ; Christian Doctrine, Wil- 
mers; Elocution; The Eaws of Thought, Poland; 
Elements of Philosophy, Hill ; Political Economy, 
Devas. 

Special Classics. * 

The studies in the classes of Special Classics will be 
selected from the Classes of Rudiments, First and Second 
Academic. Arnold? s First Latin Book and White'' s First 
Greek Book will also be used as text-books. 



English Special. 

English — For reading : Dry den's Palamon and Arcite ; 
Pope's Iliad, Books I, VI, XXII and XXIV; The 
Sir Roger De Coverly Papers in the Spectator ; Gold- 
smith's Vicar of Wakefield ; Coleridge' s Ancient 
Mariner; DeQuincey's Flight of a Tartar Tribe; 
Cooper' s East of the Mohicans ; Lowell' s Vision of 
Sir Eaunfal ; Haivthorne' s House of the Seven Gables. 
For special study of the subject matter, rhetorical and 
logical structure : Shakespeare' s Macbeth ; Milton' s 
Paradise Eost, Books I and II ; Burke' s Speech % on 
Conciliation with America ; Carlyle's Essay on Burns. 

Eatin — The same as in Special Classics. 

Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Physiology — See 
Courses in College. 

French and German — See Preparatory and College 
Courses. 
Mathematics, Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry ; 
Trigonometry. 

* See pages 48, 49 and 51. 



The Course of Studies in the 

College Department of the 

Classical Course. 

1898-1899. 

(For entrance requirements see page 40). 



Freshman. 

(Grammatica Suprema.) 

English — Diction sentences and paragraph ; the prin- 
ciples of descriptive and narrative writing ; versifica- 
tion ; Genung* s Rhetoric. An English composition, 
either prose or verse, once a week. 

Memory Studies: I. The Chorus from " Atalanta in 
Calydon," Swinburne; 2. The Song for St. Cecilia's 
Day, Dry den ; 3. Mont Blanc, Coleridge; 4. Instans 
Tyrannus, Browning; 5. Adonais, Shelley; 6. To the 
Blessed Virgin, Chaucer. 

For study of literary form and logical structure : Phil- 
osophy of Style, Spencer ; Joan of Arc, De Quincey ; 
Essay on Burns, Carlyle ; Paradise Lost, Book I, 
Milton ; Civil and Moral Essays, Bacon ; Essay on 
Warren Hastings, Macaulay. 

History of England, Burke^s Lingard. Elocution once 
a week. 
Eatin — Review of Syntax seen in Preparatory School ; 
Bennetts Eatin Grammar; The laws of quantity and 
versification, Casserly^s Eatin Prosody ; Kleutgeri* s 
Ars Rhetorica. 

Authors : Cicero de Amicitia et Senectute ; Sa litis t, 
Jugurtha or Catilina ; Horace'' s Odes and Epodes ; 
Selections from Catullus, Tibullus and Propertius, 
Mame. 

Themes twice a week with special attention to style and 
construction ; verse making ; daily practice in speak- 
ing Eatin. 
Greek — Yennfs Greek Grammar; Repetition of Verbs, 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 55 

regular and irregular; Syntax to Moods of Verbs. 
Repetition of the Appendices; Syntax from Moods of 
Verbs to end. 
Authors : Plato' s Apology and Crito ; Herodotus. 
Themes once a week on Syntax studied. 

Christian Doctrine — Wilmers' Handbook of Religion, 
Part II, Sect. I, Chap. Ill and Sect. II, Chap. I and 
II to p. 363. Lectures on Christian Doctrine once a 
week. 

Mathematics — Wentworth' s Complete Algebra from end 
of Quadratics completed. 

French — Otto' s Grammar ; Grandgent' s materials for 
French composition, Part I., Kimball's materials for 
French composition; L/Abbe Constantin, Halevy ; 
I v a Belle Nivernaise, Daudet ; DuvaP s Histoire de la 
literature Frangaise. Themes once a week. 

German — Cook's Otto's German Grammar. Character- 
istics of the leading dialects. Written exercises in nar- 
rative style once a week. Deutsche Iyiteraturgeschichte. 
Selections from Gcethe, L,essing and Schiller. 



Sophomore* 

(Human it a tes . ) 

English — Lectures by the Professor on the structure and 
history of the various kinds of Poetry, on the Imagi- 
nation and its development, on poetic expression and 
measures, on complex description and simple exposi- 
tion and on the amplification of the Paragraph. 
Genung ' s Rhetoric. 

Memory studies: 1. The Art of Criticism, Pope ; 2. 
Prologue to Endymion, Keats ; 3. Hymn on the Na- 
tivity, Milton ; 4. Ode to a Skylark, Shelley ; 5. Ode 
to the Passions, Collins ; The Holy Grail, Tennyson. 
Analysis made of Macaulay' s Essays on Milton, Clive 
and Addison; Wordsworth's Excursion; Tennyson' s 
Passing of Arthur ; Cowper's Task ; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner ; History of the United States, 
Johnston. Elocution once a week. 

IvATin — Prosody reviewed. Horatian metres studied. 
Kleutgen' s Ars Rhetorica. 
Authors : Horace's Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetica ; 
Cicero, Pro rege Dejotaro and Pro L,ege Manilia ; 
Selections from L,ivy. 



56 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 

Themes twice a week in prose and verse, special atten- 
tion paid to the construction of the Latin period. 
Daily practice in speaking Latin. 

Greek — Syntax and dialects reviewed. Prosody. 

Authors : Demosthenes^ Olythiacs or Philippics ; Homer, 
Selections from the Iliad ; St. Chrysostom, for Eutro- 
pius ; Aristotle's Poetics. 

Christian Doctrine — Wihners^ Handbook of the Chris- 
tian Religion, matter as in Freshman class. Lectures 
on Christian Doctrine once a week. 

Mathematics — WentwortW s Trigonometry and Survey- 
ing ; Analytical Geometry. 

Science — Chemistry ; Remsen } s Introduction to the Study 
of Chemistry ; Remsen's Laboratory Manual. Labor- 
atory practice under the direction of the Professor. 



Junior. 

(Rhetorica.) 

English — Lectures on forensic, deliberative and demon- 
strative Oratory ; on exposition, argumentation, per- 
suasion ; on the scientific structure of the drama. 

The leading speeches in Goodrich'' s British Eloquence 
analyzed. special studies made of Hayne ) s speech 
on the Foote Resolution, and Chatham^ s on American 
Affairs; Milton'' s Paradise Lost, Book II; Shakes- 
peare^ s King John and Comedy of Errors; Orations 
and Arguments, Bradley. 

An original speech or a critical essay to be written every 
week. 
Latin — Ars Rhetorica, Kleutgen. 

Authors: Cicero'' s in Verrem (De Suppliciis); Persius^ 
Satires; Plantus, Miles Gloriosus; Quintilian, Books 
X et XII. 

Compositions twice a week in the oratorical or histori- 
cal style. Occasional exercises in Latin verse. 
Greek — Authors: sEschines vs. Ctesiphon; CEdipus Ty- 
rannus, Sophocles ; Thncydides, Book I; Aristotle** s 
Rhetoric, Book III., cc. VIII., et seq. 

Compositions twice a week in oratorical style. 
Christian Doctrine — Wilmers'' Handbook of Religion, 
matter as in Freshman class. Lectures on Christian 
Doctrine once a week. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 57 

Mathematics — Taylor* s Differential and Integral Calcu- 
lus or Mechanical Drawing and Descriptive Geometry, 
Faunce. 

Science — Chemistry twice a week. Tarr's Qualitative 
Analytical Chemistry. 
Laboratory course under the direction of the Professor. 



Senior. 

[Phi lo sophia.) 



Mental Philosophy — Logic, Ontology, Cosmology, Psy- 
chology, Natural Theology and Ethics ; Russo' s Logic 
and Metaphysics; Rtisso's Ethics and Natural Right; 
Disputations. 

Physiological Psychology — The Anatomy and Physi- 
ology of the central nervous system ; Anatomy and 
Physiology of the end-organs of the nervous system ; 
the localization of cerebral function ; correlation of 
the nervous mechanism and mental conditions and 
actions; Hypnotism, etc. Two hours a week. 

Physics — Gage's Elements of Physics; Lectures by the 
Professor; laboratory practice in Physical and Elec- 
trical measuresments. 

Geology — Dana's Elements of Geology. 



Societies of the Students. 



The Sodality of the Immaculate Conception, 

Under trie patronage of St. Stanislaus Kostka, was 
organized in the year i868-'69, and is intended to incite 
the students to greater piety, and especially to devotion to 
the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

Officers: — Director, Patrick J. Hughes, S. J.; Pre- 
fect, George A. McLaughlin ; First Assistant, Richard 
H. Splaine ; Second Assistant, Eugene J. Feeley ; Secre- 
tary, Benjamin F. Teeling ; Treasurer, Charles J. Maguire ; 
Instructor of Postulants, Daniel J. Chapman ; Sacristan, 
Charles A. Finn ; Assistant Sacristan, John F. Walsh. 

Consultors : — John P. Sheehan, Joseph L. Powers, 
Ambrose A. Dore. 

Thirty members. 



The Sodality of the Holy Angels, 

Was organized in the year 1875-' 76, for the younger 
students. 

Officers : — Director, Rev. Charles F. Bridges, S. J. ; 
Prefect, Joseph A. Corcoran; First Assistant, Joseph J. 
Gillan ; Second Assistant, John E. Powers ; Secretary, 
Arthur M. Fagan. 

Consui/tors : — Arthur I v . Myers, George A. Toohey, 
Joseph M. Duffy. 

Twenty-five members. 



League of the Sacred Heart. 

Promoters' Council. 

OFFICERS: — Director, Patrick J. Hughes, S. J. / Pres- 
ident, Daniel J. Chapman ; Vice-President, Felix F. Car- 
roll ; Secretary , John D. Regan ; Treasurer, Eugene J. 
Feeley ; Sacristan, Joseph A. Corcoran. 

Promoters : — Philosophy, Daniel J. Chapman, George 
A. Mclaughlin ; Rhetoric, Eugene J. Feeley, Edwin P. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98. 59 

Does; Sophomore, Edward M. Sullivan; Freshman, 
Patrick J. McCarthy, William H. Dee, Joseph P. Lynch; 
Second Grammar, Felix F. Carroll, Joseph A. Corcoran, 
Arthur E. Myers ; Third Grammar, John D. Regan, Ed- 
ward T. Mullin, James E. Collins ; Special Latin, James 
Iv. McGovern, Michael W. Feeley ; Special English, 
George C. Shields; First Rudiments, James I. Coleman, 
Matthias J. Gately ; Second Rudiments, Eugene A. Hodg- 
kinson . 

Eeague Associates, 402. 



Boston College Athletic Council* 

Moderator, William J. Duane,S.J. ; President, George A. 
McLaughlin; Treasurer, Richard S. Teeling; Secretary, 
Edward F. Crowley ; Maurice F. Flynn, Timothy J. Shan- 
ahan, Edwin P. Does, Victor M. Pelletier, Joseph R. Wil- 
liams, Hugh A. Drum, Joseph C. O'Kane, Denis J. Mc- 
Gillicuddy, Roy McG. Randall, Edward J. Fegan, Richard 
S. Burke, Henry C. Moriarty. 

Manager of Foot Ball Team, Joseph R. Williams. 

Manager of Base Ball Team, Edwin P. Does. 

Manager of Track Athletics, Denis J. McGillicuddy. 

Graduate Advisory Board, Dr. William A. Dunn, '72, 
John A. Brett, '88, John D, Drum, '90. 



Dramatic Classes* 

Instructor, Joseph H. Willis, A. M. 

Two plays of Shakespeare were read during the year by 
all the students of the College, the Preparatory School and 
the English Department. The plays were Julius Csesar 
and Midsummer Night's Dream. On Wednesday evening, 
December 29, 1897, in the College Hall, Julius Csesar was 
presented by students of the College, and on Wednesday 
evening, May 4, 1898, Midsummer Night's Dream was 
presented by the students of the Preparatory School. 

During the coming year Shakespeare's King John and 
The Comedy of Errors will be read and will be presented, 
one during the Christmas Holidays and the other during 
the Easter Holidays, by the students respectively of the 
College and Preparatory School. 



60 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^8. 

St. Cecilia Society. 

The St. Cecilia Society, organized in the year i868-'69, 
supplies the music at College Mass and gives aid, when 
needed, at celebrations, either of the College or of the 
Church of the Immaculate Conception. 

Director, Prof. Thomas F. Donnelly; Organists, George 
A. McLaughlin and Edward M. Sullivan. 



Students' Library. 

The Students' Library consists of a collection of four 
thousand volumes, especially adapted to the consultation 
and home use of the student. The large and elegantly 
appointed room is open to them from two to three o'clock 
on school-day afternoons. 

Librarian, Joseph J. Mclaughlin, S. J. ; Assistant Li- 
brarian, John E. Powers. 



The Stylus. 

The Boston College Stylus is a journal founded by 
members of the Class of 1884. In 1889 the publication 
was suspended, but resumed December, 1893. Its objects 
are to aid the students in their literary work, to reflect 
their college life and to serve as a medium of communica- 
tion between undergraduates and alumni. It is issued 
monthly from October to June inclusive. The Board of 
Editors and Managers is elected annually, towards the end 
of May, from the students of the College classes bv the 
existing officers. 

Director, Rev! Patrick J. Cormican, S. J. 

Board of i897~'98: — Editor-in-Chief, David G. Sup- 
ple, '98 ; Exchange Editor, Benjamin F. Teeling, '98 ; 
Domi Editor, James D. Russell, '98; Athletic Editor, Ed- 
win P. Does, '99; Society Editor, Ambrose A. Dore, 1900 ; 
Class Editor, Joseph R. Williams, '99 ; Business Manager, 
John B. Doyle, '99 ; Assistant Business Managers, James 
A. Supple, 1900 ; Victor M. Pelletier, 1901 ; Edward F. 
Ryan, 1901. 

Board oe i898-'99 : — Editor-in-Chief, John B. Doyle, 
'99; Exchange Editor, Joseph R. Williams, '99; Domi 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 61 

Editor ■, Edmund D. Daly, '99 ; Athletic Editor, Edward F. 
Crowley, 1900 ; Society Editor, James A. Supple, 1900 ; 
Class Editor, Victor M. Pelletier, 1901 ; Business Man- 
ager, Ambrose A. Dore, 1900 ; Assistant Bttsiness Managers, 
Edward F. Ryan, 1901, Joseph Iy. Vincent, 1902, Jerome 
C. Iyinehan, 1902. 



Fulton Debating Society of Boston College. 

Moderator, Francis P. Donnelly, S. J. 

First Term: — President, Francis J. Carney; Vice- 
President, Benjamin F. Teeliug ; Secretary, Joseph L,. 
Powers ; Treasurer, Ambrose A. Dore ; First Censor, John 
F. Walsh ; Second Censor, Thomas J. Lavelle. 

Second Term: — President, Benjamin F. Teeling ; 
Vice-President, John B. Doyle ; Secretary, Thomas B. 
Jameson ; Treasurer, Frederic J. Allchin ; First Censor, 
John F. Walsh ; Second Censor, John B. Prendergast. 

The number of members is limited to fifty. 

Among the subjects debated during the year are the 
following : — 

Resolved, ' ' That the action of the miners in striking in 
Pennsylvania is justifiable." 

Resolved, " That intercollegiate football promotes the 
best interests of colleges." 

Resolved, u That Hawaii should be speedily annexed to 
the United States." 

Resolved, " That the French Revolution was not jus- 
tifiable." 

Resolved, "That party lines should not be drawn in 
municipal politics." 

Resolved, " That the power of the Speaker of the Na- 
tional House of Representatives should be further re- 
stricted." 

Resolved, " That in rejecting the proposed Single Cham- 
ber Bill, the people acted against their best interests." 

Resolved, "' That all acts of the Legislature affecting the 
charter of the City of Boston should contain the refer- 
endum." 

Resolved, " That strikes when lawfully used are a proper 
means by which the laboring classes may combat the op- 
pression of capital." 

Resolved, "That cabinet ministers ought to have seats 
and the right to speak in Congress." 



62 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 

Resolved, u That Cuba should accept autonomy from 
Spain." 

Resolved, u That the Papacy in the middle ages was a 
beneficent power in European affairs." 

Resolved, u That it is for the best interests of the United 
States to build and maintain a large navy." 

On Thursday evening, March 24, in Boston College Hall, 
the Society held a joint debate with the Forum of Harvard 
University on the subject : Resolved, u That the adoption 
of an inheritance tax is advisable." 

The Annual Prize Debate took place on Tuesday evening, 
April 26, in Boston College Hall. The question, " Should 
the present mode of electing United States Senators be 
changed?" was debated. Mr. Hugh J. Molloy, who was 
president of Alumni Association of Boston College, acted 
as chairman. Bartholomew B. Coyne, '98, and David G. 
Supple, '98, upheld the affirmative, and Benjamin F. 
Teeling, '98, and Thomas B. Jameson, 1900, the negative 
side of the question. The following gentlemen were judges 
of the debate: Elmer H. Capen, D. D., President of Tufts 
College ; James R. Murphy, Esq., Rev. Thomas F. 
Brannan, Prof. George P. Baker, J. Edmund Burke, Esq. 

At the close of the debate, Elmer H. Capen, D. D., the 
chairman of the judges, announced their decision and pre- 
sented the gold niedal, which had been donated in memory 
of the late Senator James E. Hayes, '85, to Thomas B. 
Jameson. 

The Bapst Debating Society of the Preparatory School 

of Boston College. 

(Organized in February, 1895.) 

Moderator, Joseph A. Mulry, S. J. 

First Term: — President, James J. McMorrow ; Vice- 
President, Edward J. Hennelly ; Secretary , John A. Lynch; 
Treasurer, James F. Connolly ; First Censor, Jerome C. 
Ljnehan ; Second Censor, Thomas J. Burke. 

Second Term: — President, Edward J. Fegan ; Vice- 
President, Joseph E. Vincent; Secretary, Joseph A. Een- 
non ; Treasurer, John H. Merrill ; First Censor, Felix 
F, Carroll ; Second Censor, John B. McCormick. 

The number of members is limited to fifty. 

Among the subjects debated during the year are the 
following : — 

Resolved, " That expeditions to the North Pole are ben- 
eficial." 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 63 

Resolved, " That the death penalty should be retained 
as the punishment for wilful murder." 

Resolved, " That the publication of Sunday newspapers 
should be prohibited by law." 

Resolved, "That public sentiment has more force than 
the law." 

Resolved, " That Hannibal showed greater generalship 
than Alexander." 

Resolved, " That the American Revolution was more 
beneficial in its results than the French Revolution. 

Resolved, " That the United States should maintain a 
larger standing army." 

Resolved, "That Sherman was a greater general than 
Sheridan." 

Resolved, " That the curfew law should be enacted for 
Boston." 

Resolved, " That the theatre of to-day has more influ- 
ence for good than for evil." 

Resolved, " That the United States has gained more 
glory from its navy than from its army." 

Resolved, "That secret societies are prejudicial to the 
best interests of the community." 

Resolved, " That military glory is a fit subject for am- 
bition." 

Resolved, " That Stanley is entitled to more credit for 
what has been done in the exploration of Africa, than 
Livingstone." 

Resolved, " That the United States should form alli- 
ances with the republics of South America rather than 
with European nations." 

The Annual Prize Debate took place in Boston College 
Hall, on Monday evening, June 27. The question, 
" Should a curfew law be enacted for Boston? " was de- 
bated. Mr. Benjamin F. Teeling, president of the Fulton 
Debating Society, acted as chairman. The debaters were : 
James J. McMorrow, Thomas J. Burke, for the affirmative 
and Joseph M. Duffy and John H. Merrill, for the nega- 
tive. The following gentlemen were judges of the debate : 
Monsignor Thomas Magennis, John D. McLaughlin, Esq., 
John C. Bossidy, M. D., Timothy W. Coakley, Esq., Jo- 
seph C. Pelletier, Esq. 

At the close of the debate, Monsignor Magennis, the 
chairman of the judges, announced their decision and pre- 
sented the gold medal which had been donated by Dr. M. 
F. Gavin, to Thomas J. Burke. 



Officers of the Alumni Association 
for 1 898-1 899. 



President 
Dr. Samson A. Callanan, '82 



First Vice-President 
Rev. Daniel C. Riordan, '79 

Secretary 
Joseph C. Drum, '94 



Second Vice-President 
Rev. John J. Ryan, '85 

Treasurer 
Dr. Thomas J. Ball, '82 



Historian 
Rev. John F. Cummins, '72 

Executive Committee 



James R. Murphy, '72 
Rev. P. H. Callanan, '77 
Rev. John M. Gallagher, '78 
Rev. James W. Allison, '79 
Rev. M. J. Doody, '80 
Rev. John A. Daly, '81 
Dr. F. M. O'Donnell, '82 
Hugh J. Molloy, '83 
Dr. Francis J. Barnes, '84 
Rev. Thomas F. Brannan, '85 
Dr. Francis J. Keleher, '86 



Dr. John B. Curtis, '87 
Dr. Joseph F. O'Brien, '8, 
Rev. Francis W. Maley, ' 
John D. Drum, '90 
Joseph C. Pelletier, '91 
James A. Desmond, '92 
Rev. W. G. Mullin, '93 
Rev. Francis H. Houston, 
George J. Weller, '95 
David D. Leahy, '96 
Nicholas D. Corbett, '97 



89 



'94 



Benjamin F. Teeling, '98 



Commencement Exercises. 



Baccalaureate Services were held in the church of 
the Immaculate Conception on Sunday, June 26, at 7.45. 
The Vespers were sung by the Quartette under direction 
of Mr. George E. Whiting, organist. The Celebrant was 
Rev. Thomas I. Gasson, S. J. Rev. M. J. Doody, '80, 
delivered the Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Prize Night of the Preparatory School of Bos- 
ton College was June 27. Prize Debate of the Bapst 
Debating Society. 

Prize Night of the College was June 28. Edward 
F. Crowley, 1900, spoke on u The Poetry of the Lyre, 
Principle and Precept;" Edmund D. Daly, '99, on u The 
Poetry of the Buskin, Classic Principles of Tragic Art ;" 
Joseph P. Cady, '99, on u Application of Principles in 
Antigone." 

Graduation Exercises, Wednesday evening, June 29. 

A Problem for the Higher Civilization, 

Benjamin F. Teeling 

Shall the United States found a National University 

Bartholomew B. Coyne 

Have Animals Rights ? - - David G. Supple 

Master's Oration - - Michael J. Dwyer, A. B. 

Valedictory Francis J. Carney 



66 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-98 

The Degree of Master of Arts* was conferred on 
James Matthew Mclaughlin, and Michael J. Dwyer. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred on: — 

^^Timothy Joseph Ahern 

X^iiomas Francis Bergin 
^ John Andrew Brewin 

Francis Joseph Carney 

Daniel Joseph Chapman 

^ Bartholomew Bernard Coyne 
Francis James Dore 
Charles Francis Duffy 
John Francis Duffy 

Arthur Leo Farrell 

William Joseph Farrell 
Maurice Francis Flynn 

John Vincent Gallagher 
Thomas Christopher Garrahan 
4— Thomas Joseph Grady 

^ Edward John Grainger 
?L Joseph Leo Keogh 

^ James Thomas Landrigan 

Charles Joseph Maguire 

George Alfred McLaughlin 
Patrick William Murphy 
^Charles Thomas O'Brien 
<>L Henry Michael Rooney 
James David Russell 
John Peter Sbeehan 

Richard Henry Splaine 
David Gregory Supple 

Benjamin Francis Teeling 
Arthur Joseph White 

*The -Degree of Bachelor of Arts was conferred periculo facto Thursday, 
December 30, 1897, 



College Department. 



Award of Prizes. 



In the Class of Mental Philosophy, 

The Gold Medal (gift of the Rev. 
Michael O'Brien, P. R. of Lowell,) 

was awarded to - - - Bartholomew B. Coyne 

The Premium to Joseph L. Keogh 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Francis J. Carney, David G. 
Supple, Francis J. Dore, Timothy J. Ahern, Benjamin F. Teeling, 
Daniel J. Chapman, James D. Russell, John P. Sheehan. 

Henry M. Rooney, who entered the class too late to compete for 
honor, is worthy of special mention for uniform excellence. 



In the Class of Physics, , 

The Gold Medal was awarded to - Bartholomew B. Coyne 
Worthy of Honorable Mention: Benjamin F. Teeling, Henry M. 
Rooney. 



In the Class of Rhetoric, 

The Gold Medal was awarded to - Eugene J. Feeley 
The Premiums to Edmund D. Daly 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Charles A. Finn, John J. Sheehan, 
John J. Hayes, William D. Nugent. 



In the Class of Sophomore, Section A, 

The Gold Medal was awarded to - William B. Finigan 
The Premium to John F. Walsh 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Dennis J. Maguire, Ambrose A. 
Dore, George H. Quigley. 



68 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 

In the Class of Sophomore, Section B, 

The Gold Medal was awarded to - James A. Supple 
The Premium to David C. Coleman 

Worthy of Honorable Mention: Edward A. Costello, Edward J. 
Fraher. 



In the Class of Freshman, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to Edward F. Ryan 

The Premium to Dennis J. Lynch 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : William H. Dee, Edward A. 
Dacey, Walter J. Mitchell, Peter L. Regan. 



In the Class of Freshman, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Joseph P. Lynch 

The Premium to William J. Rich 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Charles M. Finn, William F. 

McNamara, John. J. O'Hara, George A. Gately, Hugh C. McGrath, 

Charles L. Kimball, John A. Reardon. 



In the Class of Analytical Chemistry, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : John R. Sennott 



In the Class of General Chemistry, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : James A. Supple, Martin J. 
Welsh, Edward A. Costello, Edward J. Fraher. 



In the Class of Calculus, 

The Medal was awarded to - - Charles A. Finn 
The Premium to Eugene J. Feeley 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Vincent L. Kelly, Edward A. 
Costello, James A. Supple, John F. Walsh. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 69 

In the Class of Descriptive Geometry, 

The Medal was awarded to Daniel A. Foley 

Worthy of Honorable Mention: Denis J. Coveney. 



In the Second Class of Mathematics, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to Edmund D. Daly 

The Premium to Martin J. Welsh 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Ambrose A. Dore, William D. 
Nugent, William B. Finigan. 



In the Second Class of Mathematics, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to John P. Crotty 

The Premium to Joseph P. Lynch 

Worthy of Honorable Mention: David C. Coleman, Joseph L. 
Vincent, George A. Gately, James A. Donnelly, William J. Rich. 



In the Class of Higher Algebra, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to - - Dennis J. Maguire 
The Premium to - John J. Phinn 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Dennis J. Lynch, William E. 
Tierney, J. Herbert Kendregan, George H. Quigley. 



In the Class of Higher Algebra, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to - - Edward J. Fegan 
The Premium to James C. Murphy 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : John J. O'Hara, William F. 
McNamara, Leo F. O'Neil, Patrick A. Devaney, Walter J. Roche. 



In the First Class of French, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to Edward A. Dacey 

The Premium to Dennis J. Lynch 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Emile E. Renaud, William H. 
Dee, Thomas P. Hession, Peter L. Regan, Wilfred B. Cunningham. 



70 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 

In the First Class of French, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Joseph P. Lynch 

The Premium to William J. Rich 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Walter J. Roche, John A. Rear- 
don, John P. Crotty, Augustus L. Sullivan, William T. Curry, 
Hugh C. McGrath, George A. Gately, Edward C. McGrath. 



Special Competition Prizes. 



Christian Doctrine. A first prize of One Hundred 
Dollars (founded by the late Denis H. Tully) for the best 
Thesis on the subject: "Scripture and Tradition" was 
awarded to Timothy J. Ahern. 

A second prize of Fifty Dollars (founded by the late 
Denis H. Tully) for the next best Thesis on the same 
subject was awarded to Henry M. Rooney. 

The Alumni Prize. Fifty Dollars (gift of the Alumni 
Association) for the best English Essay on the subject : 
" L,eo XIII., Twenty Yearsof a Pontificate " was awarded 
to James D. Russell. 

The Oratorical Prize. Fifty Dollars (a gift of a 
graduate of '84) for the best written and spoken oration 
was awarded to Francis J. Carney. 

The judges were: Rev. W. G. R. Mullan, S. J., Henry 
Haynie, Esq., George H. Conley, Esq., M. J. Sughrue, 
Esq., and Peter F. Gartland, Esq. 

Reading. A prize of Twenty-five Dollars (founded by 
the Young Men's Catholic Association of Boston College) 
was awarded to Francis J. Carney. 



The Preparatory School. 



In the Class of Middle Grammar, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to John C. Buckley 

The Premium to Henry A. Callahan 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : William E. Tierney, Michael T. 
Sweeney, Edr/und C. Sliney, James H. Breen, James J. Flynn. 



In the Class of Middle Grammar, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to James J. McMorrow 

The Premium to Edward J. Fegan 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Leo F. O'Neil, Jerome C. Line- 

han, James F. Connolly, Thomas J. Burke, James E. McCarty. 
DeCourcey J. Driscoll was promoted to this class at the Middle 

Examination. 



In the Class of Lower Grammar, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to James A. Doyle 

The Premium to George B. Mahan 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Francis J. Fitzpatrick, J?.mes E. 
Collins, Charles E. Logue. 



In the Class of Lower Grammar, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Daniel P. Miley 

The Premium to James Maloney 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : John H. Sullivan, William J. 
Hurley John D. Regan, Walter N. Fogarty, Frederic Murphy. 



In the First Class of Rudiments, Section A, 

The Premium was awarded to - Henry C. Moriarty 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : William T. Miller, Hugh F. 

Ferguson, Thomas Flinn, Jeremiah F. Moriarty, Aloysius T. Hig- 

gins, Patrick J. Lydon, Joseph P. Sheanon. 



72 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897^98. 

In the First Class of Rudiments, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to . - - Francis X. Enwright 
The Premium to David H. Fulton 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Joseph A. Barden, Matthias J. 
Gately, James J. Treanor, John J. Cummings, John V. Barrett, 
John J. Sullivan, James J. Brennan, Eugene B. Cummings, Michael 
J. Shealey, Michael S. Gibbons, Basil S. Gavin. 



In the Second Class of Rudiments, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Joseph J. Gillan 



In the Class of Geometry, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to James H. Joyce 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Robert A. Harney, Daniel F. 

Gallagher, Edward J. Hennelly, Edward A. Dacey, John M. Fox, 

Francis J. Fitzpatrick, Daniel J. Prendergast. 



In the Class of Geometry, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Edmund C. Sliney 

The Premium to Joseph F. McGlinchey 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : William H. Koen, Francis L. 
Carney, Walter L. Flanagin, William J. Hurley. 



In the Second Class of Algebra, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to - - William T. Miller 
The Premium to William J. Callahan 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Joseph P. Sheanon, James L. 
McGovern, John M. Burke, George B. Mahan, William E. Murphy. 



In the Second Class of Algebra, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Francis X. Enwright 

The Premium to James J. Green 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Walter N. Fogarty, David H. 

Fulton, John E. Powers, John J. Cummings, Joseph A. Barden, 

Alfred A. Green. 



BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-' 98. 73 

In the Second Class of Algebra, Section C, 

The Medal was awarded to Patrick H. Clancy 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : James P. Moran 



In the First Class of Arithmetic, Section A, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Edmund F. Moran, Thomas Flinn, 
William H. O'Brien, James I. Coleman. 



In the First Class of Arithmetic, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to Matthias J. Gately 

The Premium to Michael J. Shealey 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Aloysius T. Higgins, Eugene B. 
Cummings, Michael S. Gibbons, James J. Treanor, Albert M. Leahy, 
John V. Barrett, Timothy J. Sullivan, Stephen F. Ryan. 



In the Second Class of Arithmetic, 

The Medal was awarded to : Thomas A. Conlin. 



In the Second Class of German, 

The Medal was awarded to Edward J. Fegan 

The Premium to Joseph F. McGlinchey 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Martin A. Lorenz 



In the Third Class of German, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : William S. Rooney 



In the Second Class of French, Section A, 

The Medal was awarded to - • Edward F. Ryan 
The Premium to - - Edmund C. Sliney 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Walter J. Mitchell, Charles A. 
Murphy, William E. Tierney, James H. Breen, Daniel J. Carroll, 
John C. Buckley, John P. Delaney, Francis J. Corbett, James T. 
Mulroy. 



74 BOSTON COLLEGE, 1897-^98. 

In the Second Class of French, Section B, 

The Medal was awarded to - - Leo F. O'Neil 
The Premium to James J. McMorrow 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : lames F. Connolly, Jerome C, 

Linehan, John M. Fox, Thomas J. Burke, Joseph A. Lennon, Cor- 
nelius J. Norris, James E. McCarty. 



In the Third Class of French, Section A, 

The Premium was awarded to - John M. Burke 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : James E. Collins 



In the Third Class of French, Section B, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : John J. Phinn 



In the Third Class of French, Section C, 

The Medal was awarded to Patrick A. Devaney 

The Premium to Francis J. Glover 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Joseph R. Donnelly, Joseph M. 
Duffy, James H. Joyce, James F. Gaffney, Timothy M. O'Connor. 



In the Class of Special Classics, Section A, 

The Premium was awarded to - John M. Fox 

Worthy of Honorable Mention: James H. Joyce, Joseph F. 
McGlinchey, John M. Burke, William H. Koen. 



In the Class of Special Classics, Section B, 

The Premium was awarded to - Patrick A. Devaney 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Francis J. Glover, John J. Phinn. 



In the Class of Special English, 

Worthy of Honorable Mention : Edward F. Moran, James F. 
Gaffney. 



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